May 2013

CLASS NOTES

1940's | 1950's | 1960's | 1970's | 1980's | 1990's | 2000's | Friends | In Memory

1950's

Bob Binhammer ’51 was the subject of a front-page article ("Anatomy of a dedicated prof" by Rick Ruggles) in the April 7, 2013, edition of the Omaha World-Herald. Binhammer has been an anatomy professor at the University of Nebraska Medical Center for more than 30 years, but this year is a little different--he's doing his teaching as an unpaid volunteer so that UNMC will have the budget capacity to hire additional professors. Binhammer teaches the anatomy course that all first-year medical students take and he is renowned for his quirky humor and tough tests. Nor is one likely to find a truer liberal arts spirit than Binhammer's. The article notes his interests in bird watching, opera, gardening, poetry, singing, sailing, and wood carving. He's 84 years old and plans to continue teaching medical students for as long as he's able.

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1960's

Jim VanZandt ’60 was inducted into the Comstock (Mich.) High School Athletic Hall of Fame in April. VanZandt excelled in high school tennis and then became a member of the Kalamazoo College tennis team that won four league championships along with Kalamazoo College's first NCAA Mideast Regional Championship in 1959. He earned his B.A. in history at K. After college, he coached tennis at Galesburg-Augusta (Mich.) High School, where he won 11 league titles, 10 regional titles, four state runner-up titles and six state championships. He coached Kalamazoo College's women's tennis team to two league championships, and he coached the Kalamazoo Valley Community College Women's team to six Regional Championships and 10 Michigan Community College Athletic Association State Championships.
Turner Lewis (D.V.M.) ’63 has provided veterinary care for the sled dogs of the Iditarod Race for 20 years. The 1,050-mile odyssey attracts a yearly field of more than 75 participants (called mushers) and more than 1,000 dogs. The race takes its name from the Iditarod (Athabaskan for "far distant place") Trail that runs from Anchorage to Nome in Alaska. The race is run in early March and conditions for human and canine can be brutal. Lewis and other Iditarod veterinarians work tirelessly and in the most difficult of conditions in the wild. Lewis has also provided his services to other major dog sled races. An article on his work appeared recently online.
Joel Thurtell ’67 spoke at the annual conference of the California League of Bond Oversight Committees on May 10 in Sacramento. His subject was how he broke last year's major story about the state's Capital Appreciation Bonds. "For California and, more recently Texas, the Capital Appreciation Bond story is big news. For me, and for Michigan, it's 20 years old," says Thurtell. "I described what happened back in 1992 and '93--How a general assignment reporter at a general interest newspaper came up with a story that was on nobody's radar."
Hardy Fuchs ’68 enjoyed a recent reunion with Becky Gray '81 (see photo). Said Hardy: "In addition to working with Becky when she applied for the Rhodes, I also got to know her as a student in at least one German course. She did her study abroad in Erlangen, Germany." Gray is the first and only Rhodes Scholar from Kalamazoo College. She was on campus in February 2013 to speak during the Community Reflection Program called "Why We Play," which features athletes explaining and celebrating their decisions to participate in intercollegiate athletics at K. Fuchs served as the College's advisor for the Rhodes Scholarship and Marshall Scholarship in the early 1980s.
Janet Oakley ’68 is an award winning author of memoir and essays. She has been published in various magazines, anthologies, and other media including the Cup of Comfort series and Historylink, the on-line encyclopedia of Washington State history. She writes social studies curricula for schools and historical organizations, demonstrates 19th century folkways, and is the curator of education at a small county museum in La Conner, Washington. Her historical novels, The Tree Soldier (set in 1930s Pacific Northwest) and The Jossing Affair (set in Norway during World War II) were PNWA Literary Contest finalists. She currently is revising a novel set in mid-19th century Washington Territory. She writes non-fiction as well, applying her research skills to both genres. In 2006 she was the manager of a History Channel grant, researching old court cases in early Washington Territory. She especially enjoys the hunt in old newspapers, court cases, and other delights in archives around the country. The history of the Pacific Northwest is rich and not as well known in the rest of the country beyond Lewis and Clark's expedition. But crucial happenings took place in the region that influenced the formation of United States. Oakley's latest non-fiction project focuses on a 19th century ship that was a part of the coastal trade between Puget Sound and San Francisco.
Steve Elkinton ’69 was honored with a Lifetime Achievement Award in April by the national organization American Trails, Inc. He received the award during the 21st International Trails Symposium, which was held in Fort McDowell, Arizona. The award recognizes his 24 years of service with the National Trails System. Since 1989 Elkinton has been a program leader for the National Trails System in the National Park Service's Washington headquarters. He has provided leadership and worked tirelessly to further the intentions and spirit of the National Trails System Act within the context of public land management. His key contributions to trails include: helping grow the national system of trails; building interagency collaboration and coordination; expanding and fostering partnerships and citizen stewardship; increasing communication and sharing of best practices; mentoring and sharing historic knowledge; promoting and advocating for trails; and increasing public awareness and appreciation of trails. After graduating from K, Elkinton worked for two years at the American Friends Service Committee in Washington, D.C., obtained a Masters of Landscape Architecture from the University of Pennsylvania (1976), and worked for two years at the Pittsburgh firm of Environmental Planning and Design. He joined the National Park Service in 1978. Since 1989, Elkinton has been a convener and facilitator, a trusted friend and mentor to many in the trails community and beyond, and an invaluable resource of knowledge and information. He has helped shape, expand and protect a national system of trails that has become a treasure and legacy for all Americans and future generations. Elkinton (right) is pictured with American Trails' Candace Mitchell and Robert Searns. (National Park Service photo courtesy of Diane Banta)

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1970's

Helen (Tatro) Rietz ’70 developed a deep interest in watercolor painting after she moved to Montana. (See her painting "Jingle Bobs." Jingle Bobs are the bells that dangle from a wrangler's spurs.) Today her interest in painting has become a serious avocation. Last year she was invited to join The Art Center, and she now hangs her works in several local businesses and galleries. She is busily preparing for her first solo show. Helen writes: "Yes, I know, while at K I demonstrated no visible artistic talent. That's the value of a liberal education: keep your mind open, don't be afraid to venture into something new, and who knows what you may discover." To see some of her works, visit the Center's website at www.theartcenterhelena.com and look for Helen Rietz. Email HLRietz@gmail.com
Paul Shapiro ’70 was recently elected to the Board of Directors of the ArtSchools Network, an international organization supporting art education in schools, colleges, and universities. Paul can also be seen in the recently released (online) holiday film, All I Want is Christmas with Elliot Gould. Paul is pictured with Gould in a scene from the film.
Dave Warmack ’70 was inducted into the Comstock (Mich.) High School Athletic Hall of Fame in April. Warmack earned nine high school letters in football, baseball, and track. He played football at Grand Rapids Community College for two years and finished his career at Kalamazoo College as a two-year two-way starter (fullback and linebacker). After college, Warmack enjoyed a successful prep coaching (baseball and football) and teaching career. As a varsity baseball coach for eight seasons, he won three conference championships. His varsity prep football tenure (23 seasons) includes nine conference, four district, three regional, and one state championship. At the college level he coached football at Central Connecticut College and Wabash College. He then returned to Kalamazoo College to coach the Hornets for eight seasons. During that tenure his teams beat Hope College on three occasions.
Larry Pfaff ’73 is a professor of psychology at Spring Arbor University and one-half of a K-Alum-K-Professor co-authorship combination. Larry and Associate Professor of Psychology Karyn Boatwright wrote an article titled "Perceptions of Women and Men Leaders Following 360-degree Feedback Evaluations." That article has been accepted for publication in the journal Performance Improvement Quarterly. Said Larry, "I really respect Karyn and the work she does. It has been fun to work with her."
David Simmons ’75 has been inducted into the Riverview (Mich) Hall of Fame. The retired educator has had a lasting impression on thousands of students at Riverview Community High School. He earned his B.A. in mathematics from K, studied abroad in Muenster, Germany, and swam as a member of the Hornets swim team. Simmons began his career at Riverview the fall after he graduated. Simmons taught numerous classes in the mathematics department, as well as some classes in physical education, most notably swimming. In addition to his role as teacher, Simmons was known to many students as their coach. He coached track for 10 years, two years as head coach; cross country for five years; boys varsity swimming for eight years and girls varsity swimming for 20 years; and middle school swimming for 10 years. Simmons is a long distance runner who has participated in more than 20 marathons. He was an active member of the Riverview Education Association, serving as treasurer for 15 years. He negotiated labor agreements for the teachers for 24 years, while serving as the chief negotiator for 10 years. Simmons and his wife, Maryann, have been married 27 years and have three children and two grandchildren.
Susan Dobrich ’76 is a judge of the Cass County (Mich.) probate and family courts. She was inducted into the Edwardsburg Public Schools Hall of Fame on April 27. She received the school district's 2012-2013 Lifetime Award. A recognized leader in Michigan's probate and family courts system, Dobrich earned a law degree from the Thomas M. Cooley Law School. She was Cass County's first female prosecutor, and served as legal counsel to the Cass County Board of Commissioners before practicing both municipal and family law. She was elected the Cass County Probate Court judge in 1994 and became the County's family court judge in 1997. Her family treatment court operates with numerous state and federal grants to help abused and neglected children as well as families affected by substance abuse. The work has resulted in the replication of the local program in several Michigan counties. As a member of the Governor's Task Force on Child Neglect and Abuse, she recommends improvement in the state's child welfare system. In other roles, she helps write legislation involving the protection of children and works on the restructuring of Michigan's court system. In 2012, she was one of 20 attorneys to receive the Women in the Law award from Michigan Lawyers Weekly.
David Harris ’79 rode his old bike 180 miles from Houston to Austin on April 20 and 21 in order to raise money to fight Multiple Sclerosis. His efforts raised nearly $22,000.

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1980's

Kenneth Newell (M.D., Ph.D.) ’80 is president-elect of the American Society of Transplantation. He earned his M.D. from the University of Michigan Medical School and his Ph.D. (immunology) from the University of Chicago. After completing a fellowship in abdominal organ transplantation, he remained at the University of Chicago as a faculty member in the Section of Transplantation. In 2001, Newell moved to Emory University where he is currently Professor of Surgery and Director of the Living Donor Kidney Transplant Program. Newell's professional activities are devoted entirely to transplantation. He is an active transplant surgeon whose clinical practice focuses on kidney transplantation in adults and children, pancreas transplantation, and living kidney donation. His research interests span the spectrum from basic laboratory investigation to translational studies and clinical trials. His laboratory has used experimental models of organ transplantation to study alloimmunity, immunosuppression, and tolerance. His scholarly work has resulted in more than 100 peer-reviewed manuscripts as well as numerous review articles and book chapters. He joined the American Society of Transplantation (AST) in 1995 and has served as a member of many AST committees. He is currently completing a term as a member of the AST Board of Directors. Newell also has participated as faculty in a number of AST-sponsored symposia and postgraduate courses including serving as a faculty member for the annual Fellows Symposium each year since 2006. His contributions to peer review include associate editorship for the American Journal of Transplantation and his role as a reviewer for the National Institutes of Health and Canadian Institutes of Health Research with a 4-year rotation as a permanent member of the Transplantation, Tolerance, and Tumor Immunology study section.
Helvi Sandvik ’80 received the annual Anchorage (Alaska) Chamber of Commerce Athena Award in March. She was one of 10 women in Alaska feted at the annual Athena luncheon. The Anchorage Athena Society promotes women in business and recognizes women who have inspired other women to achieve their full potential. Sandvik is the president of NANA Development Corporation; she was inducted into the Athena Society in 2004. She has won numerous business awards, including being named "Alaskan of the Year" in 2010 by the Alaska State Chamber of Commerce. She received her B.A. in economics at K and did her study abroad in Caen, France. She earned her M.B.A. from the University of Alaska Fairbanks.
Monica Whitaker ’80 and fellow K alum, the Reverend Jacob Bolton '04, joined Alycia Ashburn and toured the LEED Platinum Friends Center vegetated roof in Philadelphia as part of the GreenFaith Fellowship Program, a comprehensive educational and training program for religious environmental leaders from diverse faith traditions. Bolton serves as Associate Pastor at Huguenot Memorial Presbyterian Church in Pelham Manor, New York. A postulant for Holy Orders in the Diocese of the Rio Grande, Whitaker is studying for a Masters of Divinity degree at Church Divinity School of the Pacific in Berkeley, California, and serves as Seminarian at St. John's Episcopal Church in Oakland. Pictured are (l-r): Alycia, Jacob, and Monica.
John Bradley ’83 was recently awarded a New York State Council on the Arts grant for his early music choral ensemble Polyhymnia. The grant will support program expenses and artists' salaries.
Lynn (Arsht) Gandhi ’83 has been named chair of the Michigan Chamber of Commerce Tax Policy Committee for a two-year term. The committee works closely with the legislature, industry, and state agencies on a variety of tax related issues, particularly those related to state and local tax. Gandhi also serves as secretary of the State Bar of Michigan's Tax Council and chair of the American Bar Association's Gross Receipts Tax subcommittee. Gandhi, who majored in economics and business and studied abroad in Italy, is a partner in the Honigman Miller Schwartz and Cohn LLP Tax Practice Group. She has been named in Best Lawyers in America from 2010 to 2013, and in Michigan Super Lawyers in 2011 and 2012. Gandhi earned a J.D. from Wayne State University Law School and an LL.M. in taxation from New York University School of Law.
Dawn Schluter ’86 has been appointed to The American Cancer Society's Nationwide Gift Planning Advisor Council for the Great Lakes Region. The council supports the mission of ACS by providing estate and financial planning expertise related to charitable giving. Schulter is a principal in the Troy (Mich.) office of the law firm of Miller Canfield. She leads the firm's Personal Services Group and has extensive experience in estate planning, trusts, taxes, and family law when drafting estate and wealth transfer plans. At K she earned her B.A. in political science and studied abroad in Muenster, Germany. She earned her J.D. from Wayne State University Law School.
Laura Behling ’89 has been named Dean of the College/Vice President of Academic Affairs at Knox College (Galesburg, Ill.) She is currently associate provost for faculty affairs at Butler University (Indianapolis, Ind.). Behling is a former professor of literature who has taught at Gustavus Adolphus College and Palacky University in the Czech Republic She earned her B.A. in English at K and studied abroad in Muenster, Germany. She earned a master's degree in science and medical journalism (Boston University) and a Ph.D. in English and American literature (Claremont Graduate School). In addition, she also holds a degree from the Institute for Educational Management at the Harvard University Graduate School of Education.

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1990's

Charles Holmes ’93 was completing his medical education when he lived and worked for three months in Malawi in 1999. The AIDS epidemic there, uncontrolled, was peaking. Desperately sick people lay three to a bed in the Lilongwe hospital where Holmes worked, and where the best medicine on hand could only alleviate their agony until they died. "Deaths were an hourly occurrence," he said later. "It was an important and formative experience for me to be a firsthand witness to that tragedy." It has shaped his work and interests ever since, he added. In January 2013, he packed his bags for Africa again, to lead the Centre for Infectious Disease Research in Zambia, widely considered one of the most effective in-country programs to improve health care capacities in a resource-poor country. A story about Holmes appeared in Science Speaks: HIV and TB News, a project of the Center for Global Health Policy.
Kimberly Osborne ’93 accepted a new position with the United States Department of Defense. Her title is Chief Strategic Communications Advisor, and she works with the Afghan Ministry of Defense (Army and Air Force) as an Army civilian. She is assigned to a counterpart senior member of the Afghan government, whom she mentors and advises on issues of strategic communications and public affairs. Kimberly will be living at Camp Eggers in Kabul for one to two years. Camp Eggers is headquarters of NATO Training Mission-Afghanistan and is within the Green Zone in an area that includes the adjacent International Security Assistance Force (ISAF), the United States Embassy, and the Afghan Ministry of Defense, where she works. "President Karzai's palace is also nearby," Kimberly wrote. "In my role, my team will be helping to construct cohesive civil-military relations and improve defensive capacity building efforts. It is a momentous time in world history and in foreign affairs, and I am excited to be part of the effort to serve the people of Afghanistan and the United States." Kim earned her Ph.D. in adult education at University of Georgia, and she keeps a blog about her work. She says: "I credit Kalamazoo College with planting the seed of my interest in international affairs and seeing that I can make a difference!"
Katherine (Katie) (Clark) Prater ’97 has a new job as an attorney in the law firm of Clark, Bray & Cameron, P.C., also known as Upper Michigan Law. She earned her undergraduate degree in history at K and her J.D. from Hamline University School of Law (St. Paul, Minn.). She practiced law for nearly 10 years in Minneapolis before returning home (Escanaba, Mich.). Katie will be practicing in the firm's workers' compensation division, representing workers' rights.
Matt Priest ’97 celebrated the first birthday of his daughter, Sawyer, with a party attended by offspring of fellow Kalamazoo College alumni. Might this be a sign of class reunions to come? Time will tell. Pictured at the party are (l-r): Kuba Sheaff (son of Colin Sheaff '97), Mina Calvert (daughter of Mat Calvert '97), Cordelia and Beatrice Hayes (daughters of Alyssa Stone Hayes '97 and John Hayes '96), Maeve Altman (daughter of Alexandra Foley Altman '97 and Chris Altman '97), Isaki Calvert (son of Mat Calvert '97), Eloise Leverenz (daughter of Alexis Frankfort Leverenz '97), and the guest of honor herself, Sawyer Priest. The photo was taken by Alyssa Stone Hayes '97.
Bethany Whitehead ’98 has been named executive director of Banfill-Locke Center for the Arts (Fridley, Minn.). She earned her bachelor's degree in international studies and women's studies at K and studied abroad in Erlangen, Germany. She earned her master's degree in art administration from St. Mary's University of Minnesota. She has worked as a development assistant at the Como Zoo and Conservatory Society and as a membership director at Walker Arts Center. She also worked at the American Craft Council as a development associate. She joins the Banfill from the Playwright's Center of Minneapolis, where she worked as membership manager for the Center's 1,200 members in 46 states.

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2000's

Felicity Hesed ’00 served as emcee of the Alameda (Calif.) Architectural Preservation Society's Annual Awards Event in May. Hesed is a circus artist and comedienne whose performance credits include emcee for the Clown Cabaret (San Francisco), Lysistrata (St. Louis), the Tangerine Family Circus (Chicago), the Pickle Family Circus (San Francisco), and Cabaret Lunatique with Teatro ZinZanni (San Francisco). After earning her B.A. in theatre arts at K, she completed the Clown Conservatory Program (San Francisco), and has trained in acrobatic and aerial arts at the Actors Gymnasium (Chicago) and the Circus Center (San Francisco). This summer she will perform in Bay Area Children Theatre's Circus Adventure.
Jennifer (Vasas) Kim ’01 and her husband, Dennis '00, are excited to announce the birth of their second child, a daughter, born on July 8, 2012. Natalie Rebekah Sora Kim joins big sister, Ava, who is 2. Dennis and Jenny live in St. Petersburg, Florida, where Dennis has opened his own allergy/immunology private practice and Jenny has joined a small group pediatric practice.
Kristina (Shafer) Freese ’02 and her husband, D.J. Freese, announce the birth of their second child, Ellie. She was born September 21, 2012. The family lives in Trenton, Mich. Kristina is on the faculty at Wayne State University School of Medicine in the section of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. She recently completed her board re-certification as a physician assistant. D.J. is an English teacher at Monroe High School.
Zak Montgomery ’02 is a professor at Wartburg College (Waverly, Iowa) and his wife, Sarah Rupp '02, is a professor at Northern Iowa University (Cedar Falls). Both remain close to their service-learning roots at Kalamazoo College. "Sarah and Zak were among our first serious service-learning leaders" soon after the Mary Jane Underwood Stryker Center for Civic Engagement (CCE) was founded, according to CCE director Alison Geist. The couple recently collaborated on a service-learning project that paired Wartburg College students in Zak's service-learning course "Latinos in the United States" with sixth graders at the George Washington Carver Academy. The teams of two worked to document the sixth graders' American Dreams (Suenos Americanos) in text and photographs. "Having my students do this kind of service-learning gives them real-life applications for the theoretical concepts we talk about," says Montgomery. Sarah was one of the project's researchers. "The American Dream" project was a joint effort sponsored by Wartburg College's Center for Community Engagement, the University of Northern Iowa's Reaching for Higher Ground Initiative, and the Carver Academy Parent Involvement Committee. The goal is to promote improved literacy among Carver's English Language Learner students.
Tim Muir (Ph.D.) ’03 is the first professor at Augustana College to be named the Dr. Larry P. Jones Endowed Fellow in the Natural Sciences. Jones, a 1965 Augustana graduate and long time professor and researcher at the University of Texas-El Paso, established the research fund before his death. Muir's research focuses on the biochemical and physiological mechanisms that help turtle hatchlings survive the extreme cold winters in the upper Midwest. The fellowship supports Muir and a research assistant in this endeavor, which might one day have implications for medical cryopreservation and organ transplantation.
Phil Kotzan ’04 married his partner of eight years, Andrew Somera,in Carmel Valley, Calif., on September 16, 2012. Several alumni joined the festivities. Pictured are (l-r): Reyes Llopis (an exchange student at K in 2000), Cortney (Rhadigan) Ritsema, Andrew and Phil, Claire Tobin '04, and Jessie Wagner '04.
Jacob Condon ’05 has been promoted to editor at Northern Lights, an editorial and post production boutique located in New York and Los Angeles and featuring filmmakers and visual artists with a passion for telling stories. Condon's work has appeared on top networks, including Discovery, TruTV, TBS, Lifetime, Cloo, and A&E. He has been with Northern Lights since coming on board as an assistant in 2006 and has steadily worked his way up to editor. He has done a range of broadcast promo projects as well as advertising and branded content assignments for top brands such as Lancome and Western Union.
Jason Kohl ’06 graduated from UCLA in 2012, and his thesis film, The Slaughter, enjoyed its world premier at the 2013 South by Southwest Film Festival in Austin, Texas. The former German major has won a prestigious German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) fellowship to spend a post-graduate year in Berlin, where he will work to found a film company.
Emily Cornwell ’07 is first author of a study reported in the March issue of the Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation. The study describes a new technique, non-lethal to fish, for detecting the presence of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus. Fish infected with VHSV usually die within weeks. VHSV is incurable, which means that minimizing its presence is critical, and that depends on good detection methods of its presence. Previous methods were lethal to fish and not as sensitive as the new technique. Associate Professor of Biology Ann Fraser remembers Cornwell as "a true innovator. She spent multiple summers doing fish research as an undergrad (in Oregon and Maine)," says Fraser. "She has pursued her passion and it has yielded great results." Cornwell is a graduate student in the dual-degree Veterinary Medicine/Ph.D. program at Cornell University. She has already earned her doctorate. Cornwell also won the prize for Best Overall presentation at Cornell's first annual DVM Research Poster Symposium.
Marlene Guerrero Chavez ’08 was selected to serve as a youth delegate for the 51st session of the United Nations Commission for Social Development. The priority theme of the 10-day conference, which took place in February in New York City, was "Promoting empowerment of people in achieving poverty eradication, social integration, and full employment and decent work for all." The session featured panel discussions, more than 30 side events, five draft resolutions, and the Civil Society Forum's recommendations on promoting people's empowerment to achieve social development goals.
Derek Gianino ’09 has joined the U.S. Global Leadership Coalition as national outreach director. In this position he will lead the USGLC's efforts working with business, community, and faith leaders across the country on the importance of America's engagement in the world. Gianino was most recently Deputy National Coalitions Director for Mitt Romney's presidential campaign, overseeing national outreach efforts to veterans, sportsmen, and farmers. Gianino earned his B.A. from K, majoring in political science. He studied abroad in Aberdeen, Scotland. More recently he received his Master of Public Policy degree from American University in Washington, D.C. USGLC is a broad-based influential network of 400 businesses and NGOs; national security and foreign policy experts; and business, faith-based, academic, and community leaders.

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2010's

Claire Eder ’10 has a new job. She is editor at Nanostructured Energy Systems Laboratory at the University of Florida.
Lisa Gernand ’10 will climb Washington's Mt. Rainier this August. An alumna of the religion department and LandSea program, Lisa finds great joy and fulfillment in being challenged and humbled by the great outdoors. In addition to being a personal achievement, her climb will benefit the Lutheran Volunteer Corps, a one-year volunteer program in which Lisa participated in Seattle. For information about ways you can support her in this effort, e-mail her at lisagernand@gmail.com.

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In Memory

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1930's

Arthur Whiteley ’38 died on April 15, 2013. He earned his B.A. at K in biology. The following year he earned his master's degree in zoology from University of Wisconsin. He taught at Cal Tech, focusing his research on sea urchins, before beginning a long teaching career in cell biology at the University of Washington (UW). There his interest and work on sea urchins continued. His wife was world renowned geneticist Helen Riaboff. The couple worked for 60 years at UW and at the Friday Harbor Laboratories. In honor of Riaboff, Friday Harbor Laboratories established the Helen Riaboff Whiteley Center, a retreat for scholars of all disciplines and for artists of all professions. The center was conceived and guided her husband.

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1940's

Luel Simmons (Jr.) ’42 died on February 1, 2013. He was a faithful and enthusiastic friend and supporter of Kalamazoo College for more than 70 years. He met his wife, the late Marian Wilson Simmons '42, when they co-edited their high school yearbook at Kalamazoo Central High School. At K, Luel was a member of the Scholars Group, editor of The Boiling Pot, president of the College Singers, and a member of Sigma Rho Sigma. He earned his B.A. in economics and business and graduated from Harvard Business School. Throughout their lives, he and Marian maintained an active involvement with Kalamazoo College, serving on the Alumni Executive Board and spending 12 years on the Emeritus Club Board, four of them as co-presidents. They jointly received the College's Distinguished Service Award and the Emeritus Club Citation of Merit. Luel was a member of the Stetson Society and the 1833 Society. He also wrote a book on the life of Henry Overley, the first head of the College's music department and a renowned composer. Luel and Marian established a scholarship fund which bears their names. Luel served his country in the U.S. Navy during World War II, rising to the rank of Lieutenant Commander. After the war he spent his career in the steel business in Kalamazoo and Detroit. For 28 years he was with Production Steel Company (later Whittaker Steel), where he was vice president. He later joined the German company Thyssen Steel and subsequently founded and served as president of Elsimco, Inc., a firm involved in international trade. Luel and Marian were among 13 founding families of St. Stephen's Episcopal Church, where he served five terms as Senior Warden, was a member of the building committee, and served as the first choir director. The family later returned to Christ Church Cranbook, and Luel served as treasurer and senior Warden (twice). Luel and Marian raised three children and took them to 47 of the contiguous states. Later trips took the couple to some 80 countries and a circumnavigation of the globe. For 49 years they lived on Squirrel Road in Bloomfield Hills, Mich. In 2004 they moved to Fox Run Retirement Community in Novi, Mich. There Luel worked on two committees: the Committee for the Center for Continuous Learning and the Philanthropy Committee. He and Marian, who died in May of 2011, continued to recruit star students for Kalamazoo College, including Aidis Tuxari '09, who was a leader in the Guilds of Kalamazoo College. Luel is survived by two children--Marylu Simmons Andrews '66 and William--and five grandchildren and eight great grandchildren.
Norman Erway ’44 died on March 31, 2013. He graduated from Kalamazoo Central High School in 1940 and attended Kalamazoo College, where he won several prizes in chemistry and graduated with majors in chemistry and physics. Norman worked on the Manhattan Project of the Atomic Energy Commission at the University of Chicago during World War II. On June 9, 1945, he and classmate Wilma Fechter were married at Stetson Chapel. In 1946, they moved to Wisconsin, and Norman attended graduate school in chemistry at the University of Wisconsin. In 1947, they started a scientific glassblowing business making and repairing scientific glass apparatus for universities and laboratories all over the country and overseas. Norman was most proud of having been the glassblower for many Nobel Prize winners at UW-Madison. Norman loved to downhill ski and did so frequently in the United States and in Europe. He continued this pastime until he was 87 years old. He and Willie traveled extensively, visiting six continents, most recently China in 2007. Norman was passionate about the conversion of the family farm he enjoyed as a youth into the Michigan Audubon Society Otis Farm Bird Sanctuary. He and Willie helped finance the building of a floating boardwalk through the marsh and the renovation of the barn into a nature center.
Bruce Milroy ’44 died on April 10, 2013. He attended Kalamazoo College as a member of the Class of 1944. He enlisted in the Air Force during World War II and served in Brazil. He completed his B.A. at the University of Michigan. He was a violinist, a gifted artist, an avid bicyclist and golfer.
Winona (Lotz) Swope ’45 died on April 4, 2013. She was a lifelong Kalamazoo area resident, graduating from Kalamazoo Central High School (1941) and Kalamazoo College (psychology). Soon after, she began working as a secretary at the Upjohn Company. Her strengths were quickly recognized and she was asked to become a founding staff member of the W. E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research. Winona married C. James "Jim" Swope on October 14, 1950. As a member of the Kalamazoo First United Methodist Church, Winona served on the Caring Committee. She enjoyed traveling in Europe and numerous U.S. National Parks.
Jane (Anderson) Barnhart ’47 died on Friday, March 1, 2013. She matriculated to K from Port Huron, Mich. and earned her B.A. in economics and business. She earned a master's degree from Southern Connecticut State College. She was a longtime resident of Indianapolis who volunteered her time with the White Cross Guild of Chapel Hill and still found time to care for her family at home.
James Gilmartin ’47 died on Saturday, February 23, 2013. He attended Kalamazoo College and earned his B.A. at Western Michigan University. He earned his D.D.S. from the University of Michigan School of Dentistry. Following service as a Captain in the U.S. Army Dental Corp in Orleans, France, he established private practices in California and Florida. He enjoyed fishing, hunting, and skiing.
Jeanne (Hill) Ramsey ’47 died February 23, 2013. She matriculated to Kalamazoo College from St. Joseph, Mo., and completed her undergraduate education at Western Michigan University. She was member of the American Legion Auxiliary and supported many charities. She was employed by Aspirus Wausau Hospital as a medical technologist for 30 years. Jeanne enjoyed spending time in her backyard with her flowers and birds, and she was an avid golfer and card player. She also loved to travel with family and friends.
Warren Taylor ’47 died February 24, 2013. He was an officer in the Army Air Corps during World War II, serving in North Africa. Following his honorary discharge, he completed his B.A. at K, majoring in physics. He earned his Ph.D. in physics from Ohio State University in 1952 and was immediately hired by Sandia Laboratories where he worked as a nuclear physicist until his retirement. Taylor was a longtime resident of Albeuquerque, N.M., and throughout his life was committed to the youth of Albuquerque, serving them through the Boy Scouts, his church, and as a judge for the New Mexico Science Fair.
Monteith Bilkert ’48 died on April 19, 2013. Bilkert served in World War II as a pilot aboard the aircraft carrier Petroff Bay. On March 24, 1945, he married Virginia Norden. He earned his degree at K in economics and business and had a long career in sales, including service with the E.W. Bliss Company and with Cutler Real Estate. He retired in 1986 from First Federal Savings and Loan, where he served as senior loan officer. Bilkert served as a board member and as construction site coordinator for Habitat for Humanity in Canton, Ohio. He enjoyed camping and traveling across the U.S. and Europe, as well as woodworking and gardening. A lifelong churchman, he served Faith United Methodist Church in whatever capacity needed.
Eleanor (Heystek) Menz ’48 died on April 24, 2013. She began undergraduate work at Albion College, where she attended for two years. At the outbreak of World War II, she enrolled and received her diploma from the Henry Ford School of Nursing and then spent an additional semester studying public health at the University of Michigan before joining the U.S. Army. She served at Percy Jones General Hospital in Battle Creek, as well as assignments in the Chicago area, and was discharged as a second lieutenant in December 1946. She completed her B.A. (biology) at K and was licensed as a registered nurse. She worked for several years at Community Hospital in Battle Creek, leaving as director of nursing in 1952. From 1963 to 1965 she was the director of the nursing program at Kellogg Community College. Menz then took additional coursework and worked as a psychiatric nurse at the VA Hospital for many years, retiring in 1982.
Cleo (Vlachos) Chapekis ’49 died on February 6, 2013. She was born in Kalamazoo and became a longtime resident of Bloomfield Hills, Mich. She received her B.A. from K, majoring in English, and earned her master's degree in education from the University of Michigan. She was a teacher in the Kalamazoo Public Schools before moving to Bloomfield Hills.
Marjorie Jean (Hickman) Lanuti (M.D.) ’49 died on April 2, 2013. After graduating from Roosevelt High School (Ypsilanti, Mich.), she went to Kalamazoo College on a music scholarship and received her B.A. in biology. She received her master's degree from the University of Michigan in 1950 and earned her M.D. from the University of Michigan School of Medicine in 1954. She was one of five women in the entire class. She married Dr. Frank Lanuti in 1958 and was happily married for 55 years. They moved to Battle Creek, Mich., in 1965. She was the President of the Calhoun County Medical Society in 1992. In 2004 she received honorary recognition from the Michigan State Medical Society for 50 years of contributions to the medical field. She was an active member of The First United Methodist Church of Battle Creek, and a member of the Sunrise Circle at the church. She loved music and was an accomplished pianist. She also enjoyed attending Michigan State and University of Michigan football games with her family.

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1950's

Gordon Dolbee ’50 died on May 7, 2013. He matriculated to K from Battle Creek (Mich.) Central High School and earned his B.A. in economics. During his undergraduate years he played on the Hornet's men's tennis team. He also participated in intramural sports and was a member of the International Relations Club, the Sherwoods, and the Men's Union. He served as president of the latter organization. On August 23, 1950, he married Jean Louise Shivel and spent his next 63 years happily married. He was employed until his retirement by the Upjohn Company of Kalamazoo in its personnel and international divisions. He was active in many community organizations. He served as a trustee for Kalamazoo College from 1984-2002 and remained an active supporter of the College's sports program. He was honored with K's Distinguished Service Award and Trustee Emeritus status. He was an active member of the Kiwanas Club for more than 30 years and held numerous leadership roles at the First Baptist Church of Kalamazoo. He was coach and volunteer to his sons' activities, and he loved to fish, hunt, and travel.
John C. Davis ’51 on March 25, 2013. John served in the U.S. Army with the Armed Forces Radio Network. He received his B.A. in history from Kalamazoo College, and shortly thereafter married Barbara Decker. John's professional career was in management recruitment for executive placement. He most enjoyed spending time with his family and traveling.
Donald Shoup ’52 died on January 31, 2013. He was a lifelong resident of Middlebury, Ind., with the exception of the four years he spent earning his degree in economics at Kalamazoo College. After college, Shoup returned to Middlebury to work in the family business, Pioneer Manufacturing Company, and later founded Shoup Tax and Accounting Service. He was a member of the Middlebury School Board during the 1960s and served as president. He was a lifelong Chicago Cubs fan, and he loved to travel. Before he died he had visited all 50 states and also traveled internationally. He was a lifetime member of St. Paul's Lutheran Church of Middlebury, where he served on the church council.
Alfred Arkell ’54 died on May 5, 2013, after a courageous battle with cancer. He served in World War II and later as a navigator in the Air Force. He earned his bachelor's degree in chemistry at K and earned his doctorate at Ohio State University. He had a long career at the Texaco Research Center where he worked as a senior chemist until his retirement in 1982.
Michael T. Barrett ’59 Michael T. Barrett '59 died on Thursday, March 14, 2013. He was born in Kalamazoo and attended Kalamazoo College. He was a U.S. Navy Retiree having served on the USS Pueblo when it was captured in 1968. He was held as a prisoner of war for 11 months and later received two Purple Hearts, a POW Medal, and other recognitions.
Jesse Dungy (III) ’59 died on January 28, 2013, in Iowa City, Iowa,from complications of cancer. He matriculated to Kalamazoo College from Springfield, Illinois (Springfield High School) and earned his B.A. in history. He was involved in numerous co-curricular campus activities, including Sigma Rho Sigma, WJMD, the Index, and intercollegiate sports (football, track, cross-country, and basketball). He later earned a Master of Arts in Education from the University of Michigan (1972). After serving in the United States Army Signal Corp (1959-61), he began his career as an educator. Dungy was a public school teacher in Detroit, Michigan, a graduate student recruiter for the University of Michigan, and an associate vice president for planning and development at Bowie State University. In 1974 he was the recipient of the prestigious Rockefeller Administrative Internship to the President of Kalamazoo College. He retired from the Gary, Indiana, Community School Cooperative in 2012, where he taught high school social studies and history. Dungy was an avid tennis player and skier. He served as a U.S. Open tennis judge for 20 years, and skied many of the major ski areas of Europe and North America. He served on the Board of Trustees for Kalamazoo College from 1992 to 1998, and he was a longtime member of Concerned Black Men, Inc., Washington, D.C.

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1960's

Richard Buss ’63 died on March 19, 2013. He was pastor of St. George Orthodox Church in Spring Valley, Ill., for the past 18 years. In addition to the bachelor's degree (philosophy) he earned at Kalamazoo College, Buss earned a second B.A. in math from Dickinson State University in North Dakota, as well as a master's degree from Seabury-Western Theological Episcopal Seminary. Parishioners fondly remembered Buss' formidable intellect and deep humility, which combined into an extraordinary ability to explain complex theology.
Linda Anne (Banyon) Lewis ’65 died on March 2, 2013. She graduated from Benton Harbor (Mich.) High School and attended Kalamazoo College. She married Richard Lewis in 1962. She and her husband started Createc Corp., a successful foam packaging and auto parts producing company in Portland, Ind. In 2000, Lewis built Flat Rock Creek Farm and personally owned several Friesians and show ponies. Up until 2012, she was very active in showing horses and won many blue ribbons.
Bruce Litte (Ph.D.) ’66 died on January 20, 2013. He earned his bachelor's degree in English and studied abroad in Bonn, Germany. He earned a master's degree and Ph.D. in English from the University of Kansas (Lawrence). He enjoyed a long career as a professor of English and literature.
Nancy (Tierney) Yeager ’66 died on February 4, 2013, after a long and valiant battle against breast cancer. The daughter of an Episcopalian minister in Laramie, Wyoming, Nancy arrived on K's campus in the fall of 1963. She did her study abroad in Sierra Leone and decided to major in English. One of her most influential professors was Dr. Larry Barrett, of whom she said "[He] challenged us to the max, and I remember writing a paper on Moby Dick and the significance of the number three, and how exciting it was to be exploring all these ideas and images from Herman Melville." She married David Yeager '64 in 1966. During their 46 year marriage, they wandered the country (eventually settling in Atlanta) and raised two children. In Atlanta Nancy started employment at the Emory University Hospital and began a long and varied career (most recently as a computer informatics manager) with Emory Healthcare. Known for her joyous spirit and love of nature, Nancy also loved making hand-crafted dolls and jewelry and designing custom-tailored knitwear. The photo, taken two years ago, shows her with her husband, David, and their daughter, Erika.
Gail Hanson ’67 of South Haven, Mich., died at her home on March 22, 2013. She matriculated to Kalamazoo College from Paw Paw, Mich., and earned her B.A. in English. She did her foreign study in Strasbourg, France. Hanson went on to earn her J.D. from Wayne State University School of Law. After she passed the Michigan Bar Exam she moved to South Haven to begin her 42-year career as an attorney. During the years, she raised her two children, and she served as a scout leader, Sunday school teacher and a founding member of the middle school science fair. She continued to work full-time throughout those busy years. She beat cancer 16 years ago after surgery and radiation. When she learned in October 2012 that the cancer had returned and spread, she expressed gratitude for the blessings of the past 16 years.

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1970's

Barry R. Smith ’70 died suddenly on March 5, 2013. He matriculated to K from Detroit, Michigan, and majored in economics and business. He played football for the College and did his study abroad in Muenster, Germany. Following graduation from K and the University of Michigan Law School, Barry practiced law in Chicago, Grand Rapids, and Kalamazoo. He remained a proud football Hornet and long continued to attend K football games and to take great pride in wearing his favorite K gear. Smith loved everything about airplanes. He rebuilt and flew World War II trainers, flew Warbirds and the Ford Trimotor at the Kalamazoo Air Zoo, and served on the Air Zoo board for 14 years. His family was his greatest love. He and fellow graduate Elizabeth Sloan '73 were married in 1974. Liz survives along with their two daughters, Kirby and Meg.
John Mason Hooker ’74 died on March 27, 2013. He earned his B.A. in English from Kalamazoo College and a master's degree in theatre arts from the University of Michigan. He was a former instructor of theatre at Olivet College and at Interlochen Arts Academy prior to his work in higher education development. He enjoyed reading and had a passion for antique furniture and vintage movies.
Carol (Kauffman) Summey ’74 died March 19, 2013. She lived in Sturgis, Michigan. She was an administrative assistant at the Sturgis Public Schools for 10 years and also worked at the Gravi-Flo Corporation. Summey had resided previously in Green Bay, Wis., Chicago, and New Albany, Ind. She was a member of the Holy Angels Catholic Church in Sturgis and a past president of the Sturgis Junior Women's League. She enjoyed gardening, hiking, traveling, and reading.
Lynn (Minnig) Emrick ’75 died on December 10, 2012. She matriculated to Kalamazoo College from Bloomfield Hills, Mich., and earned her B.A. in psychology. During her K years she studied abroad at Aix-en-Provence, France. She earned a master's degree in counseling at Eastern Michigan University (1983) and a degree in interior design from the Delaware College of Art and Design (2002). She worked for the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor) for ten years, notably as service supervisor for the University of Michigan Hospital paging services. Upon her marriage to Donald Minnig and moving to Delaware, she worked for the Bank of New York and First USA as supervisor of the cardholder service and dispute departments. Subsequently, she joined Ethan Allen, where she worked for thirteen years as interior design and senior project manager. She also worked for Thomasville Furnishings for two years as interior designer and office administrator. She loved to cook and garden and was active in several charities.
Sheila Wang ’78 passed away peacefully on March 12, 2013, surrounded by her family. She was initially diagnosed with breast cancer in 2002 and was in and out of treatment from that time. She earned her B.A. at Kalamazoo College in chemistry. She also played junior varsity and varsity volleyball and tennis during her Hornet years. She had a distinguished professional career. She earned her Ph.D. (psychology) from Western Michigan University and worked for a VA hospital in Connecticut. She then worked at the National Institutes of Health (Baltimore) before accepting the position of research director of the Integrative Medicine Unit at Children's Memorial Hospital in Chicago. She lived her life in a remarkable way. Anyone who knew Sheila was inspired by her warmth, generosity, kindness, and love for others. Her smile and laughter were unique and contagious. She was an amazing mother, sister, daughter, grandmother, and friend. She had an intense passion for sports and the outdoors. Each of her three children--Paul, May Lin, and John--played volleyball in college, much due to her influence. There is no doubt that Sheila will be missed by all, but her beautiful spirit lives on through her family and friends. In the photo, Sheila (second from left) is surrounded by her children (l-r): Paul, John, and May Lin. (Obituary written by May Lin Kessinich)
Carole Ann Poplowski ’79 died on January 15, 2013. She lived in Warren, Michigan.
James Reineck (Ph.D.) ’79 died on April 13, 2013. At K he earned his B.A. in mathematics and did his study abroad in Bonn, Germany. He returned to Bonn as a Fulbright Scholar the year after he graduated. He earned his doctorate from the University of Wisconsin in 1985. After two years as an assistant professor at Northwestern University, Reineck came to University of Buffalo in 1987 as an assistant professor and became a full professor in 2002. He was director of graduate studies from 1999 to 2004 and continued teaching until February of this year. His research interest was dynamical systems, particularly the theory and applications of the Conley Index, which was developed by a University of Wisconsin mathematician. Reineck was a member of the American Math Society and a lifelong avid bridge player. He loved to travel. Reineck is survived by his wife and twin daughters, his mother, and his brother.

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