May 2009

CLASS NOTES

1940's | 1950's | 1960's | 1970's | 1980's | 1990's | 2000's | Friends | In Memory

1940's

Thomas Froom ’49 provided the following contact information: 10 Burncoat Way, Pittsford, NY 14534. Email twfro@aol.com

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1950's

Paul Gleason (Jr.) ’50 attended the Rochester, New York, alumni event in April. ("It was wonderful to see old friends," he wrote.) He provided the following contact information: 41 French Woods Circle, Rochester, NY 14618. Email pgleason@localnet.com
Peter Lillya ’59 , professor emeritus at the University of Massachusetts, shared the following story about the power of the Kalamazoo College network. "While a post-doctoral researcher, I interviewed for an assistant professor of biochemistry position at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, in the fall of 1972. The interview seemed to go well enough, and I was anxious to have my first 'real job.' Thus, a month or so later, when I was offered a position starting summer of 1973, I accepted with enthusiasm. When I arrived in Amherst, a couple of developments greeted me. The new, small department had hired two other assistant professors, and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts had decided to mandate a minimum number of teaching contact hours, as well as student surveys of teaching effectiveness.

"The biochemistry chair informed our threesome that in order to meet the Commonwealth requirements for contact hours we would have to create new courses and then he asked what we had in mind? After recovering from reality shock, two of us decided that we wanted to create a niche by teaching sophomore level biochemistry. Since organic chemistry is a usual prerequisite for biochemistry, we proposed that we would integrate organic and biochemistry, teaching organic in the context of biochemical examples.

"Although some of the senior biochemistry faculty had their doubts about our approach, they empathized and saw our need (to teach). Our chair was encouraging, relieved that we had solved our problem. However, a glitch developed: the organic chemists heard of our plans and appealed to the dean.

"Next thing we knew the two of us rookies were in the dean's office for brown bag lunch. The dean sat at his desk in the corner and relaxed over his lunch. We sat tensely at a barren table opposite three organic chemists. One of the organic chemists, 'Pete,' led off by saying, 'So you want to teach sophomore level biochemistry, right?' We nodded yes. He continued, 'How will the students learn the organic chemistry that they need to understand the biochemistry?' After an awkward pause, one of us managed to say, 'Ah, we will teach them what organic chemistry they need to know; our idea is to integrate the organic and biochemistry.' 'And, how is it that you are qualified to do that?' My partner jumped on that: 'I got my degree with Melvin Calvin at Berkeley who won the 1961 Nobel Prize in chemistry.' This was met with long faces, and then they all looked at me. After another painful pause, and since the pedigree approach seemed not to be working, and fearing doom, I decided on a different approach: 'Well, I am from Kalamazoo College...' Before I could finish, 'Pete' said, 'No kidding, so am I!' We got to teach the course!"

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1960's

Kenneth Elzinga ’63 received the 2009 Faculty Prize from the Jefferson Scholars Foundation at the University of Virginia. He is the Robert C. Taylor Chair of Economics and has been a member of the faculty at the University of Virginia since 1967. He was recognized for his commitment to leadership, scholarship, and citizenship. Professor Elzinga's introductory economics course is the largest class offered at the University, attracting more than 1,000 students. His Antitrust Policy seminar often has a waiting list of two years. He has received countless awards for his pedagogy. His major research interest is antitrust economics, in particular pricing strategy and market definition. He has written more than 70 academic publications but is also known for three mystery novels, co-authored with Breit (under the pen name Marshall Jevons) in which the protagonist employs economic analysis to solve crimes. The novels have been used in classrooms across the country to illustrate introductory economic principles, and have been translated into seven languages. At the Jefferson Scholars recognition ceremony, Elzinga delivered an address, "Some Unconventional Principles of Leadership," that contrasted multiple leadership styles, including the "born leader," leadership by intimidation, leadership as tactic, and leadership by disguise. "I described the roots of these theories of leadership," said Elzinga, "how counter-intuitive they seem to be, and how they can be effective. Business firms, universities, government bureaucracies, and not-for-profits all can benefit from understanding leadership styles to achieve the organization's ends."
Mary Brown ’65 spent the past winter as a weather observer in the Antarctic. She kept a very interesting blog about the experience.
Sue (Hayes) Hartman ’65 lived for six months with a family in Paris in 1966. She taught French at Chatham Hall (Virginia) during the 1966-1967 academic year. Then followed "four decades of substitute-teaching in the public schools (K-12)," she wrote. "I retired in 2008 and do not miss those 6 AM phone calls. I am in my 61st year of being a member of a church choir; I volunteer at a local no-kill cat shelter; and have artplay on view. My husband Ira and I were co-leaders on several trips with People-to-People Student Ambassadors between 1995 and 2001, a highlight of which was revisiting France, England, and Germany. New to us were the towns and cities visited in Australia and New Zealand--such a long flight from Los Angeles! Our favorite homestay was with families on an island off the coast of Denmark. We moved from Michigan to Maine in 1973, the year before our daughter Megan (Carleton College, 1995) was born. Our son Andrew was one year old. Both of them live way west of us, one assisting Mother Nature in the Seattle area, and the other working in Tucson after closing her small "green" business in Oracle. I know the roads between us, having driven solo round trip to visit each of the two. Ira retired in 2005 after 38 years teaching high-school chemistry and physics, as well as a few related courses assigned to him by the schools' administrators. When seeking a sea breeze on hot summer days, Ira and I spend time at the house my maternal grandmother (Massachusetts Institute for Technology, 1906) designed and built on the coast near Brunswick. It's a great location for flying kites! From May to September of 2008 found me working my dream job: a part-time receptionist at Ocean House, a turn-of-the-century hotel/motel in Old Orchard Beach, where most of the guests continue to be Francophones. When asked how I learned to speak French so well, I was pleased to give credit to Kalamazoo College and Marcelle Dale! Merci, aussi, M. Heintz!" Email suze@nlis.net
Charlotte (Hauch) Hall ’66 completed her one-year term as president of the American Society of News Editors. It's been a difficult year for newspapers, so much so that the ASNE canceled its annual convention because so many editors could not afford to attend. In lieu of the farewell speech the outgoing president delivers at that convenntion, Hall wrote a letter to the membership.
Ellen (Moffett) Hampton ’66 was one member of the self-styled "Diving Divas"--compatriots were classmates Susan Dasher and Amy Hale--who enjoyed a week of sun and learning to dive last winter at Susan's diving school in the Cayman Islands. Ellen was joined by her son William and her brother Bruce. Amy brought her partner Jack and Susan was joined by her partner Dora. The Class of 1966 "micro-reunion" was small in numbers and large in enjoyment. Educational too! Ellen became a certified PADI open water diver and even went on to a more advanced course in Nitrox (enriched air).
Jenny (Smith) Sanderson ’66 has retired after 30 years of teaching art at the School at Church Farm. A show of her own work--which ran through April 15 and was followed by the best of student work, both current and past--marked the announcement of her retirement to the school community. Email jensand11@verizon.net
Tom Zerbe ’66 was honored for his longtime involvement in the civil rights movement during the State of West Virginia's Civil Rights Day last February. He grew up in the 1950s in Nitro, West Virginia. The integration of his school in 1955 made evident to him the depth of racism and the need for change. In 1967 Zerbe marched in a housing demonstration in Charleston, West Virginia, and later picketed the Washington, D.C. home of Senator Robert Bryd for his stance against federal civil rights legislation. Byrd's reversal of his position made him one of Zerbe's heroes. At the time Zerbe was a public school teacher, and his participation in the civil rights movement inspired many of his co-workers and students. That was not true for school administrators who refused to renew his teaching contract or provide a reason for their action. Two years later he took a position at the West Virginia Human Rights Commission where, after a year, he was promoted from investigator to compliance director. He worked at the Commission for three years before attending law school. He practiced law for 35 years. "The Civil Rights movement took place in small towns and cities in the hills and valleys of West Virginia and all across America," Zerbe stressed. "It did not just take place in places like Birmingham, Montgomery, and Boston. " And everywhere participants often paid a high price for their stand. "Forty years ago I was 'recognized' for my civil rights activities by being fired from my job as a high school teacher and by being called a communist by local preachers from their pulpits," said Zerbe. Last February's was a "recognition" as welcome as it was different. "It's great to say 40 years later that 'We won!'"
Ralph Wellington ’68 has been nominated for election to the board of trustees of the Chicago-based Exelon Corporation, one of the nation's largest electric utilities. Wellington is chairman of Schnader Harrison Segal & Lewis LLP, a Philadelphia-based law firm. He's been a partner there since 1978 and has extensive experience representing major corporations in litigation and business matters throughout the country. He is an active appellate advocate and has argued before the U.S. Supreme Court.
David Chapman ’69 is the Wallace Professor of Education in the Department of Educational Policy and Administration at the University of Minnesota. His specialization is in international development assistance. He has worked on development assistance activities in more than 45 countries. during the spring semester of 2009 he is a Distinguished Visiting Scholar at Michigan State University. Email chapm026@umn.edu
George Drake (M.D.) ’69 is the full-time medical director for Hospice At Home, Inc., one of the oldest and largest hospices in Michigan. Its headquarters are in St. Joseph. Dr. Drake recently became board certified in Hospice and Palliative Medicine. He practiced family medicine for 31 years in Michigan, Ohio, and Indiana. He resides with his wife Jeannine in Edwardsburg, Mich.

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1970's

David Thoms ’70 , a principal in the Troy (Mich.) office of the law firm of Miller Canfield, was re-elected secretary of the board of directors of the Visiting Nurse Association of Michigan. He also was elected secretary and re-elected as a member of the executive committee of the Michigan Colleges Foundation. At Miller Canfield, Thoms is a principal in the Personal Services Group and co-leader of the Nonprofit and Charitable Organizations Group. He concentrates his practice in estate planning and tax, nonprofit organizations, business entity planning and tax, succession planning, and real estate.
Eugene Blue ’72 earned his doctorate from Michigan State University and is currently teaching accounting at George Mason University (Fairfax, Va.). He has been married for 12 years to his wife Joshlyn, and he has two stepchildren. Email eblue@gmu.edu
Michael Nelson ’73 , reference librarian and subject bibliographer in social sciences and French for University of Wyoming (UW)Libraries, received the 2009 Agnes Milstead Distinguished Librarianship Award. That award recognizes significant contributions to UW Libraries in scholarship, program development, teaching, fund raising, or improving access to library resources. Nelson has served on the Collection Development Committee at UW and his research, which concentrates on database pricing and the influence of publisher practices on end-user access to information, has resulted in highly acclaimed work published in the Journal of Academic Librarianship and online.
Elliot Shapiro ’74 wrote, "My daughter Julie has just returned from a seven-month work study in Brazil. She is a junior at Harvard. My son Danny has just enlisted in the Marines following his graduation from high school." Elliot lives in Brockton, Mass.
Jim Brink ’76 is one of the few traditional sail makers in the entire United States, the total number of which is estimated to be a half dozen. His rare skill leads to some interesting work, such as outfitting vessels seen in popular movies (Master and Commander and Pirates of the Caribbean) and, more recently, refitting the "Elissa," the pride of the Galveston Historical Foundation and the official tall ship of Texas. An important sail of the "Elissa" was damaged in Hurricane Ike, and the Houston Chronicle published a story on its repair by Brink. The San Diego-based sail maker was introduced to what became his life's work through the College's Career Service department. Brink's internship was crewing for the Brigantine "Romance" in the U.S. Virgin Islands.
Susan Dobrich ’76 , Probate Judge for Cass County (Mich.), was the keynote speaker for the annual Domestic and Sexual Abuse Services "Take Back the Night" march in her hometown of Edwardsburg in April. She said sexual assault is a community problem that communities everywhere must address. "As a community, we should bring about change and create a new social norm to speak up and be heard." Dobrich earned her law degree from Cooley Law School in Lansing. She was a Cass County assistant prosecutor in 1983 when she became the County's first female prosecutor. She was a partner in a private law firm from 1987 until 1994, specializing in family and municipal law, before being elected probate judge in 1995. She lives in Dowagiac with her husband, Police Chief Tom Atkinson.
Kay Haedicke ’77 sends along the following contact information: 6 Crescent Bluff Avenue, Branford, CT / khaedicke@hotmail.com Email khaedicke@hotmail.com
Elizabeth Saule ’77 directed "One Flew Over the Cuckoo' Nest" at the Paw Paw Village Players Theatre in Paw Paw, Michigan. Five performances of the play occurred in April.
David Harris ’78 has been named to Barron's Magazine Winner's Circle Top 1000 Advisers List. This annual list of America's top 1000 advisers selects individuals based on "assets under management, revenue produced for the firm, and quality of service provided to clients." Harris works for UBS Financial Services, Inc., in downtown Houston. He is Senior Vice President and Investments and Senior Managed Accounts Consultant. The and his wife, Sharyn, and their two daughters live in the Rice University area of Houston.
Meegan Holland ’78 was a member of a panel discussion titled "Protecting a Free Press While Journalism in Turmoil." The event took place in March at the Gerald R. Ford Museum in Grand Rapids (Mich.). Holland is online editor for MLive.com at the Grand Rapids Press. Previously she was editor and chief of Booth News Service in Lansing, Mich.
Strump Tony ’78 will be the principal of Rolland-Warner Middle School (Lapeer, Mich.) when it opens its doors in the fall of 2010. Tony is currently the assistant principal of Zemmer Junior High School in the Lapeer Community Schools.
Mary (Seaberg) King ’79 has accepted a position as Vice President at Detroit Investment Fund (DIF). DIF is a private capital fund established by Detroit Renaissance to finance high impact projects in the City of Detroit that focus on creation of jobs, affordable housing, and retail businesses. She and her husband Ken King live in Plymouth, Michigan. Ken works at ProQuest in Ann Arbor. Mary and Ken look forward to seeing many classmates at the 30th reunion October 16 through October 18. They encourage friends from other classes to come as well and to book hotel rooms early. Email kingmarys@aol.com
Ken Lampar ’79 was elected on November 4, 2008, to the Macomb County Board of Commissioners. He defeated an 18-year incumbent by a 54 percent to 46 percent margin. Lampar is a Democrat, and he thanks his classmates and other alumni for their support and friendship.
Dan Nepstad ’79 gave a speech at World Wildlife Fund in March. He described the framework of a global environmental conservation effort sufficient to arrest and reverse the progressive erosion of Earth's capacity to sustain life. Nepstad is chief program officer for the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation's Environmental Conservation Program. A tropical forest ecologist, he has studied tropical forests and strategies for their conservation for more than two decades. He's published more than 100 scientific papers and several books on the Amazon. His WWF lecture was part of the Kathryn Fuller Science for Nature Seminar series, which brings distinguished scientists to Washington, D.C. to present research vital to international conservation.

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1980's

Danny Agustin Flores ’80 continues his work at his Non-Governmental Organzation-related enterprise, Skye Blue Organization, Ltd. It is based in Coquitlam, British Columbia. Danny is involved in the development of agro-biotechnology. Email danny.flores@UNSWalumni.com
Patrick Weil ’80 will become the new principal of Highland (Ind.) High School on July 1. He had been the principal of East Chicago Central High School.
Jeannette (Pomeroy) Parssi ’81 was invited by Gibson Guitars to participate in the company's Miami GuitarTown project, a public arts project featuring 10-foot-tall Les Paul model guitars and regular size Epiphone Casino guitars painted by local and national artists placed throughout the city of Miami. Proceeds raised by the project and a subsequent auction will donated to three local charities: The Miami Music & Art Fund, Miami Children's Hospital Foundation, and The Art and Culture Center of Hollywood. Gibson shipped Parssi a naked Epiphone Casino guitar, which she turned into a work of art. The brightly painted guitar, titled "Miami, Sunrise to Sunset," features a sunrise scene on the front and the Miami skyline at sunset on the reverse side. When she was done with the painting, Parssi had the guitar autographed by all seven members of the Allman Brothers Band in order to enhance its value at auction.
Mark Yonkman ’82 has been named executive vice president and general counsel for CoBank, a leading national cooperative bank serving agribusinesses and rural utilities throughout the United States. He oversees CoBank's legal, regulatory, and board relations functions and serves on the bank's Management Executive Committee.
Chris Gawart ’83 of Quarles & Brady LLP law firm was awarded the "Five Star: Best in Client Satisfaction Wealth Manager" distinction for 2009 by Milwaukee Magazine. Gawart, the National Chair of the Trusts and Estates Group at Q&B in Milwaukee, practices in the areas of estate planning, closely held business planning, general corporate, and tax-exempt organizations. He has extensive experience representing individuals and corporate clients in wealth-transfer and related matters. He received his law degree from Indiana University School of Law. Q&B has more than 450 attorneys practicing in Arizona, Illinois, Florida, and Wisconsin.
Marian Heller ’84 organizes leadership conferences across the globe for the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. This month she travels to Singapore and southeast Asia for work and play. She writes songs, plays flute in a chamber ensemble, and plans to record a CD of her own songs this year. Email sgmarian@gmail.com
Jim Duchamp ’87 is a chemistry professor at Emory & Henry College in Virginia. He recently won the 2009 Virginia Outstanding Faculty Award given by the State Council of Higher Education. An article on Jim and the award appeared in Washington County News that noted his work as a teacher, his contributions to the community, and his research in cancer detection. The piece also noted his undergraduate experience at Kalamazoo College, particularly the lifelong influence of study abroad. Duchamp studied in Sierra Leone. The article stated that his concept of family broadened as a result of living in Sierra Leone. He's quoted, "I never felt American until I went over there. It really makes you appreciate the U.S. It also makes you sensitive to what it's like to be someone in a different culture. There's a tendency to see something different and think it's bad. I learned in Sierra Leone that when you see something different it's just different, not necessarily bad, and I'd like to try to understand why it's different."
Jeff Thompson ’88 was awarded tenure in February by the Denison University (Granville, Ohio) Board of Trustees. Jeff teaches a variety of subjects the university's biology department. He earned his Ph.D. in molecular biology at the University of California, Los Angeles.
Keith Bamberger ’89 was the keynote speaker at a program on air quality and visibility sponsored by the Pisgah (North Carolina) Astronomical Research Institute. Bamberger is a former air quality professional with the North Carolina Division of Air Quality. He has also worked for the National Park Service and is a certified Environmental Educator with the NC Office of Environmental Education.
Laura Behling ’89 is the new associate provost for faculty affairs and interdisciplinary programs at Butler University (Indianapolis, Indiana). She will begin her new position on July 1. Before taking the post at Butler she was director of the John S. Kendall Center for Engaged Learning and chair of the English department at Gustavus Adolphus College (Saint Peter, Minnesota). She earned a master's degree and Ph.D. in English and American literature (Claremont Graduate School), a master's degree in journalism-reporting on science and medicine (Boston University), and her bachelor's (English) at from "K."
John Wells ’89 is in his third year as director of off-campus study at Wells College. "Little did I realize that study abroad would become my career," he wrote. "I'm enjoying working with a new generation of students as they grow through study abroad." Email jwells@wells.edu

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1990's

Susanne Koch ’91 wrote, "It's been a long time but memories of all the good times at Kalamazoo College never fade. After 10 years in Michigan and a Ph.D. in neuroscience, I moved to Indiana, met my husband, and, a year later, we relocated to sunny California. Our family includes three fabulous kids. My former work as a research scientist has been traded in for full-time mom and part-time college instructor. I would love to hear from classmates and former German House residents." Email skochkrueg1@yahoo.com
Andres Blazquez ’92 and Irina have settled in Madrid, Spain, after a nearly one-year trip around Europe. "The only problem is that we left our belongings scattered along the way," Andres wrote, "so we need to go back and collect them. If you are coming to Spain, do get in touch with us." Email blazquez@yahoo.com
Gerald Gleeson (II) ’92 was elected a principal of the law firm of Miller Canfield. He specializes in criminal and civil litigation and has personally tried more than 180 jury trials to verdict. He works in the firm's Troy, Michigan, office.
Vicki Szabo ’92 , associate professor of history at Western Carolina University (Cullowhee, N.C.), was recently awarded a Fulbright Fellowship to continue creating a database to identify whale species from artifacts and examine historical whale-hunting patterns. Szabo will pursue her research interests at Cardiff University in Wales this fall among faculty and students interested in ancient history, archaeology and conservation, and Welsh history. She has worked on medieval whaling and related archaeology of medieval whaling since 1995, and her current research began in 2000. "I'm studying modern whale skeletons, creating an analytical database using photographs, measurements and DNA, and hopefully producing a tool to identify which whales were hunted in the Middle Ages," said Szabo. Currently, no easy method of matching whale bone artifacts to whale species exists. She will work with biologists, geneticists and whale specialists and collect data to create a database that will allow identification of whale species from whale bone artifacts. "Once we can do that, we can study artifacts from sites and figure out which types of whales they were using, whether there were patterns in the whales being hunted, and maybe even begin to reconstruct pre-modern whale populations, something zoologists cannot yet effectively do." Although Szabo has traveled to Britain, Wales will be a new experience. "I teach early British history at WCU, so being in Wales will add a new dimension to that. I'll get to visit sites that I teach about, learn new sources and come to understand Welsh culture, at least a little," said Szabo. "I'm most excited that I'll learn new research methods for both environmental history and medieval archaeology, which will be a great aid in the classes, and for graduate instruction. Hopefully, I'll also come back with new contacts, so I can help students research and study abroad more effectively." Brill publishing house recently released Szabo's book Monstrous Fishes and the Mead-Dark Sea: Whaling in the Medieval North Atlantic, which explores the perception, use and significance of whales during the Middle Ages. Because of her research, Szabo also was selected to participate in WCU's Scholarly Development Assignment Program and to receive a WCU Faculty Research Grant and an American Philosophical Society grant. She has been a member of the WCU faculty since 2001.
Kate Warner ’92 is the new artistic director of the New Repertory Theatre (Watertown, Mass.). She had been the artistic director of Dad's Garage Theatre Company in Atlanta, Ga., where she produced and directed five world premieres and many critically acclaimed shows. She's also directed at San Francisco's Magic Theatre, Tampa Bay's American State Theatre, and two Atlanta companies--Actor's Express and Theatrical Outfit. After graduating from "K," Warner completed programs in arts leadership at Stanford's Graduate School of Business and the McCarter Theatre.
Elizabeth (Arledge) Ross ’94 works at Oracle Corporation as a development manager in the Global Retail Business Unit. She moved back to the Boston area in 2007 and is having a great time there. She also looks forward to her class reunion in October. Email e.arledge.ross@gmail.com
Tom Anagnost ’95 is the new head coach of the Central Michigan University women's soccer program. He was a standout at "K" from 1991-94 and the first player from the school to be a three-time NCAA Division III All-American. He was MIAA Most Valuable Player in 1994. He was an Academic All-American twice and is a member of the Kalamazoo College Athletic Hall of Fame. He played professionally for the Chicago Power and the Michigan Bucks.
Mark Henson ’95 left Pfizer in May 2008 after six years to take a position as a senior research scientist at Molecular Biometrics. MB is a small biotech start-up focused on clinical diagnostic instrument development for the in vitro fertilization field. He and his family continue to live in Quaker Hill, Conn. Email dr_markhenson@hotmail.com
Diane Urbanski ’95 and her husband Tony Armstrong announce the birth of their first child. Lawrence Anthony Armstrong was born on January 6, 2009. Diane lives in Orlando, Florida, and works in operations at Walt Disney World. Email ddurbanski@earthlink.net
Christine Perry-Ockerman ’96 wrote (in January), "Greetings from the Pacific Northwest! After finishing my residency in Emergency Medicine from the Michigan Statewide Campus System in Garden City, Mich., I finally moved to Washington because vacationing here was getting expensive. I live and work in the Seattle area. I married an amazing man last year, Justin Ockerman. We can hardly wait until the arrival of our daughter Cynthia, debuting next month. Otherwise, life is grand!" Email cperrydo@gmail.com
Angela Bortel ’97 wrote, "I am pleased to announce the opening of The Bortel Firm, LLC, in Minneapolis. The firm focuses on immigration and civil litigation, with particular emphasis on asylum law and appellate advocacy. We also aim to meet the needs of artists and record labels in Minneapolis' vibrant music scene. The Bortel Firm provide pro bono representation to asylum seekers and trafficked persons. On a personal note, my daughter Edda is two and showing her will more and more every day, to which I say, "Good girl!" My dog Bianca is as strung-out as ever. Eric and I work, play with Edda, and sleep. Nonetheless, these are great days for our family." Email abortel@gmail.com
Christa Clapp ’97 and her husband recently moved to Paris, France. Christa works at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development on climate change policy. "So far we are enjoying the Parisian lifestyle and would welcome any 'K' visitors passing through," Christa wrote. Email christaclapp@hotmail.com
Stacy (Neterer) Ford ’97 married Graham Richard Ian Ford on April 3, 2009, in Auburndale, Florida. She and Graham honeymooned in Italy and England (Graham's native country) before returning home to the Orlando area and his two sons (see photo), Mitchell (15) and Macaulay (13). Stacy is a trial and appellate attorney at Pohl & Short, P.A., and Graham is a real estate agent at Prudential Sapphire Realty. Email s.borisov@att.net
Adam Norlander ’97 was elected principal of the law firm of Miller Canfield. He represents financial institutions in loan transactions and also practices commercial real estate law. He works in the firm's Detroit office and resides in Bingham Farms, Mich.
Gretchen (Pokorski) Reid ’97 notes that the Reid clan is doing well (and expanding) in North Carolina. Daughter Rebecca was born on September 19, 2008, and her big sister Abigail (2) enjoys her sister mightily. "I am still working with Accenture," wrote Reid, "same as when I graduated 11 years ago. If you are ever in the area we would love to see you. The photo was taken at Rebecca's baptism by her daddy, David Reid. Email gretchenpokorski@yahoo.com
Andrew Schleicher ’97 wrote a study, "Pandemic Diseases," upon which is based a FaithLink Feature article titled "Facing the Flu Outbreak." The feature and the complete study address the fears and questions arising in the midst of a growing pandemic. Schleicher is a former editor of Faithlink who currently writes and edits for multiple United Methodist Church agencies. He lives in Nashville and is a graduate of Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University and Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary. He is a provisional deacon in the Detroit Conference of the United Methodist Church. Email a-schleicher@garrett.edu
Jennifer (Spezza) DeVries ’99 and her husband Peter DeVries recently celebrated their daughter's first birthday. Elsa Domenica DeVries was born on March 3, 2008. The family lives in Happy Valley, Oregon. Email jendevries@me.com
John Latham ’99 is vice president for business development at ePrize, an interactive promotion company. He and his wife, Maja, are expecting a baby.

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2000's

Markus Boos ’00 wrote, "I was able to learn from a fellow Kalamazoo College alum while I was on my OB/Gyn clerkship at the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine. Alissa Johnston '03 was an awesome resident and taught me everything I know about obstetrics. She was there for my first delivery and also showed me the fundamentals of being an outstanding surgeon. In between delivering babies we were able to reminisce about "K" and good times there. I may be the elder statesman, but Alissa impressed me with her fund of knowledge and abilities as a teacher-not that I would expect anything less from a "K" alum. As for me, I received by Ph.D. in immunology in 2008 and will complete medical school in 2010." Email markusboos@yahoo.com
Cullen Hendrix ’00 married Sarah Glaser on February 28, 2009, in Steamboat Springs, Colo. Cullen's groomsmen were three former "K" students--Jason Hendrix, Thomas Monroe, and Jason Richards. Also in attendance were Jennifer (Getting) Jameslyn '99 and Jason Reed '99. Cullen and Sarah split time between Denton, Texas, where he is assistant professor of political science at the University of North Texas, and San Diego, Calif., where Sarah is a post-doctoral fellow at Scripps Institute of Oceanography. This summer, Cullen will start work on a multi-year project, sponsored by the National Science Foundation and the Department of Defense, on environmental threats to political stability in Africa. Email cshendrix@gmail.com
Wanda (Lam) Polderman ’00 and her husband John announce the birth of their son. Will Adam Polderman was born on June 2, 2008. "He is a delight and joy to our family and home," wrote Wanda. Email wandapolderman@yahoo.com
Amelia (Graham) Sponseller ’00 wrote, "I finished my M.S. degree in nursing, and I'm working as a family nurse practitioner at Mercy Hospital in Portland, Maine. We have a 20-month-old son, Graham, and absolutely love living in Maine! Visitors to the area are welcome to get in touch." Email ameliakgraham@yahoo.com
Noah Ovshinsky ’01 was named a 2008 award recipient by the Michigan AP Broadcasters Association for reporting on public radio for WDET-FM Detroit. The awards were presented in April. Ovshinsky received "Honorable Mention Individual Reporting."
Brooke (Nobis) Buys ’02 and her husband Trevor announce the birth of their first son. Bosley (BOH-zlee) Emerson Nobis Buys was born on December 19, 2008. The family lives in Kalamazoo. Brooke works part-time as the director of development for Kalamazoo Communities in Schools. "I love the joys of motherhood," she wrote. Email brookebond55@hotmail.com
Sara Church ’02 is engaged to be married to Rob Nicholson (Alma College Class of 2004). While he finishes his first year of residency in anesthesiology at the University of Virginia (Charlottesville), she is busy taking classes part time for an LL.M. degree in tax law at Georgetown. In her free time, Sara continues to encourage her little brother (a freshman at Bucknell) in his French studies and hopes to visit him on study abroad in a couple years! Email sara.a.church@gmail.com
Cori (Bolla) Cooper ’02 married Michael Cooper on November 8, 2008. In the bridal party were several "K" alumni, including her sister and maid of honor, Elisa Bolla '04, and Emily Siegel '02, Brooke Smith '02, and Ann Rossman '02. Email mrs.coricooper@gmail.com
Corey Spearman ’02 recently began his M.B.A. program at Arizona State University's W.P. Carey School of Business. Email corey.spearman@gmail.com
Sarah Cwiek ’03 was named a 2008 award recipient by the Michigan AP Broadcasters Association for reporting on public radio for WDET-FM Detroit. The awards were presented in April. Cwiek received "Honorable Mention Enterprise/Investigative Reporting."
Jane Kopf ’03 married Victor Stover '04 on August 2, 2008, in Detroit, Michigan. They live in Seattle, where Vic attends graduate school at the University of Washington, and Jane teaches English as a Second Language. Several "K" alumni were present at the wedding, including (l-r) Ryan Crowley '03, Mike Arce '05, Vic, Kristin Dominguez '07, Jane, Derek Jansen '05, Andrew Kurtz '05, Joe Waller '06, Josh Pfau '05, and Scott Whitbeck '04.
G. Jacob Bolton ’04 is the director of family ministries at Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church in New York and was recently named to the Presbyterian Church USA General Assembly Task Force on Youth Ministry. "Basically, the 'Presbyterian Pope' has named me to be on a group of people that researches and recommends how the entire denomination practices youth ministry in the future," wrote Bolton. He is a graduate of Union Theological Seminary and a member of the Association of Presbyterian Church Educators, the Presbyterian Writers Guild, and the National Eagle Scouts Association. He recently published an article on the use of developmental theory in a Sunday School classroom in Presbyterian Outlook, a weekly Presbyterian periodical.
Michelle Harburg ’04 finished 50th in the Boston Marathon, which occurred April 20. Michelle is a former Hornet cross-country athlete who currently lives and works in Washington, D.C. And she wasn't the only Hornet at the Boston Marathon (see photo). Running Hornets pictured (l-r) include: front row--Paige Biglin '05, Lauren Puretz '05, Inga Hofer '02, Eve Khlyavich '02, second row--Will Dobbie '04, Michelle, back row--Ian McMorran '00.
Joel Booth ’05 recently published an article titled "A Data Model for Trip Planning in Multimodal Transportation Systems" in the Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Extending Database Technologies. Email joelbooth@gmail.com
Colleen (Collins) Greene ’05 , a first-year student at Harvard School of Dental Medicine, helped organize this year's "Give Kids a Smile" free clinic at the Harvard Dental Clinic. Underprivileged children ages one to 15 came from as far away as Rhode Island to receive a free dental exam, teeth cleaning, and oral health education.
Merideth Lacina ’05 exhibited her photography at the BFA Undergraduate Exhibition at the School of Art in Chicago. The exhibition occurred in late March and early April.
Kate Schultz ’05 and classmate Tiffany Antor were interviewed by a Boston Globe reporter who mentioned their "K" affiliation in a blog about people who attended the inauguration of President Barack Obama. Email kateschultz@gmail.com
Dan Blustein ’06 left a career in Hollywood to attend graduate school at Northeastern University and design robotic lobsters. Email danblu@gmail.com
Eric James Horsch ’06 finished his M.S. in environmental economics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in May 2008. His thesis used non-market valuation techniques to quantify the economic costs of an invasive species, Eurasian watermilfoil, to lakefront property owners in northern Wisconsin. This research culminated in a publication with his supervisor, David Lewis, that will appear in the journal Land Economics in August. Eric currently works as an associate consultant for Stratus Consulting in Boulder, Colo. Email ericjameshorsch@gmail.com
Eric Larson ’06 is currently riding out the economic storm at Boston University, where he is working on a Ph.D. in biomedical engineering and playing on a champion intramural volleyball team. Email larson.eric.d@gmail.com
Elizabeth Garlow ’07 provides the following contact information: 24 Dimick, Apartment 3, Somerville, MA 02143. Email elizabeth.garlow@gmail.com
Aubrey Parker ’08 is studying chemical and environmental engineering at the University of Michigan. Earlier this year she was part of a 10-day class trip to Patagonia, Chile. The name of the class is "Sustainable Energy Development in Latin America." She and her classmates studied the local culture and customs and investigated proposed hydroelectric power plants (and alternative energy proposals) in the Patagonia region of Aysen. The class was funded through a grant from Graham Environment Sustainability Institute.
Samantha Weaver ’08 Where's Waldo?.... no, Where's the Guild Banner? Samantha (second from right) was awarded the Sustainability Guild banner because of her fine work on behalf of that Guild in her senior year. Banners for each of the other Guilds (Business, Health, and Justice and Peace) were likewise presented to graduating seniors and thus spread throughout the country. Those seniors (now alumni) sign their banner and pass it along to another Guild member who then does the same, with the process repeating until the well-traveled banner returns during a campus Guild or social event, after which it starts a new journey. The peripatetic banners are a fun way to measure the geographic and population growth of the College's charter Guilds. The idea was the brainchild of Dan Blustein '06, and Guild banners currently reside in Boston (above), San Francisco (Business), Washington, D.C. (Justice and Peace), and Chicago (Health). Pictured at the passing of the Sustainability Guild banner are (l-r): Dan Blustein, President Eileen B. Wilson-Oyelaran, E. Turner Lewis '63, Samantha Weaver, and Don Hafner '66.

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Friends

David Strauss , professor emeritus of history at "K," hosted members of the Royal Astronomical Society in London for a virtual tour of the planet Mars and its famous canals. The occasion was the featured event of the Society's May 2009 meeting, which reviewed telescopic observations of "Mars before the Space Age." Drawing on his biography of Percival Lowell, Strauss clarified Lowell's consuming passion for discovering ever more distant civilizations which contributed, along with the telescopic images of the Martian surface, to his belief in the existence of extraterrestrial life. Unhappily, the instruments of the era often distorted the surface features of distant planets, thus delaying the search for other worlds. Nonetheless, Lowell's speculations about the nature of Martian life spurred space-age efforts to learn more about the solar system and provided ample fodder for several generations of science fiction writers.

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In Memory

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1930's

Mildred (Doster) Virtue (M.D.) ’30 died on January 30, 2009. She had celebrated her 100th birthday on October 22, 2008. She earned her bachelor's degree in biology and graduated from the University of Michigan Medical School in 1934. One year later she married Robert W. Virtue. Shortly after moving to Colorado, Mildred embarked on a 37-year career as physician to the Denver Public Schools. She was recognized by many state and national professional organizations for her contributions to school and public health. She was the co-founder of Denver Educational Senior Citizens Incorporated, a nonprofit senior living community for retired Denver Public School employees.
Dorothy (Ryall) Britigan ’32 died on April 14, 2009. She majored in history at Kalamazoo College and was president of Kappa Pi.
Dorothy Scott (Matthews) Deehr ’32 , a long time resident of Manistee (Mich.), died on September 19, 2008. She grew up in Chicago, attending Wadsworth Grammar School, Hyde Park High School, and Kalamazoo College. She married her college sweetheart and classmate, C. Sterling Deehr, at the College on October 27, 1934. The family moved to Manistee in 1945, and Dorothy was an active member of the community and frequent volunteer for community affairs (including the United Way and the cancer drive). She was an honorary life member and past president of the American Association of University Women of Michigan. She was a certified teacher and taught English and French as a substitute teacher in the Manistee Area Public Schools. She earned her B.A. in English literature and was very active in co-curricular activities at "K." She was a member of the Eurodelphian Society and the Gaynor Club. She worked for Index, served as Women's League President, and was a member of the Boiling Pot staff.
Horace Horton ’33 attended Kalamazoo College for two years and completed his degree (journalism) at the University of Wisconsin. He loved his years at Kalamazoo College, during which he was a columnist for Index. He spent his career as a teacher in the U.S. Federal Prison Service. He also was a writer, and after his retirement he continued to participate in a weekly Ann Arbor writers group. He was skilled as a sign painter, a craft he learned in his youth from a minister and developed in a San Francisco sign shop during World War II. He and his wife had four children. A number of their grandchildren and a nephew are Kalamazoo College graduates.
Robert Beaumier ’36 died on January 15, 2009. He earned his Bachelor's degree and Master's degree from Kalamazoo College in political science. He worked for the U.S. Public Health Service.
Dorothy (Simpson) Palmer ’36 died on March 19, 2009. She majored in sociology at Kalamazoo College.
Kenneth Davis ’37 died on February 23, 2009. He came to Kalamazoo College from Chicago, Ill. He majored in physics and was active in many co-curricular activities. For example, he was a member of the Philolexian Lyceum and served as sophomore class president. He was a member and officer of the Glee Club and a member of the Science Club. Davis ran track and cross-country and played football. During his senior year he served as Manager of Music. After graduation Davis earned a Ph.D. at the University of Rochester (New York). He was a professor at Reed College in Portland, Ore.
Maude Southon ’37 died on April 6, 2009, in Kalamazoo, where she was born. She majored in biology and later graduated from the Case Western Reserve School of Nursing. At "K" she was treasurer of Kappa Pi, and she played basketball for three seasons. She was a surgical nurse at University Hospital in Cleveland for many years and subsequently worked at Borgess and Bronson Hospitals in Kalamazoo.
Louis Sutherland (Jr.) ’39 died on April 10, 2009.

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1940's

Margaret (Waid) Hoffman (M.D.) ’40 died on March 3, 2009. She majored in chemistry and was a member for Alpha Sigma Delta, the College choir, and the Gaynor Club. After graduation she earned a medical degree from the University of Michigan. She was a physician in the state of Florida.
James Young ’41 died on May 4, 2009. He majored in political science and ranked number three on the Hornet Golf Team. He also served as secretary of the Phi Lambda Society. He met his future wife, Sara Louise Wing '42, at Kalamazoo College, and they married when Young returned from the South Pacific. Sara died in 1990.
Constance (Peck) Reps ’43 died on February 11, 2009. She is survived by her husband of 60 years, Professor Emeritus (Cornell University) John Reps; daughter Martha Reps; and son Thomas Reps. At Kalamazoo College Connie was president of the College Players and the Overley Society, secretary-treasurer of her class, secretary of Trowbridge House, and a member of the College Singers and the Madrigal Singers. She belonged to Alpha Sigma Delta and was a member of the two honor societies, Alpha Lambda Delta and Phi Kappa Alpha. She graduated magna cum laude with an A.B. in French. She received an M.A. in French from Brown University and in 1945 returned to Kalamazoo College to teach French and Spanish and to be director of the temporary women's dormitory housed in Hoben Hall. She went on to teach French at Drury College (Springfield, Mo.) where she met her husband. She taught for two years at Triple Cities College, which is now State University of New York-Binghamton. After moving to Ithaca, New York, she was active in many organizations. She was president of the American Association of University Women (AAUW), of the Cornell Campus Club, of the Ithaca High School PTA, and of the Hangar Theatre Props, a support arm of Ithaca's summer theatre. She held offices in many other organizations. Connie was twice honored by the AAUW with a named fellowship to the AAUW Educational Foundation. She was awarded the Hangar Theatre's Osborn Award for her contributions to theatre and was given a Women Making History award for community service.
Kathryn (Turner) Wray ’43 died on January 22, 2009. She majored in sociology and came to "K" from Lawton, Michigan. She was a member of Eurodelphian Gamma, the Women's Athletic Association, and the Pan-American Club. She also played saxophone in the College Band. After graduation she worked for Dowagiac High School.
Stephen Gibbens ’44 died on March 2, 2009. Gibbens grew up in Kalamazoo and attended Kalamazoo College before joining the Naval Air Corps. During World War II he flew more than 200 missions and was awarded Air Medals and Distinguished Flying Crosses. He graduated from the University of Michigan (psychology) and did his graduate studies at the University of California-Berkeley (psychology and mathematics). Gibbens enjoyed his career in public health, health statistics, and medical care with the State of California and then with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services during the Reagan Administration. He served as Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation in HHS. Gibbens and his wife, Maggie (Leer), raised four daughters and a son. They loved to travel and made more than 20 trips to Europe, South America, and the Pacific.
Lavon (Woodward) Russell ’44 died on January 16, 2009. she earned her degree in English literature and was very active in co-curricular activities. She was a member of Alpha Sigma Delta (and served as vice president and president), and she was a member of the academic honor society, Phi Kappa Alpha. She wrote for Index and was assistant editor of Boiling Pot. She was a member of the Women's Athletic Association and served as secretary and treasurer of Mary Trowbridge House. She met her future husband, Leonard Russell, at "K," and they were married after World War II on June 28, 1947. Lavon worked as a librarian at Ohio Wesleyan University.
Phyllis (Cary) Bartlett ’48 died on April 1, 2009. She matriculated from Midland, Mich., and majored in sociology and music. At "K" she was a member of College Singers, Eurodelphian Gamma, Overley Society, Kappa Delta Chi, and the Bach Festival. She earned a master's degree from Michigan State University and worked as an elementary education teacher in the Cadillac (Mich.) Public Schools for 23 years. She was a talented organist and very active in Cadillac civic organizations.
Rosalyn (Spencer) Harris ’48 died on February 20, 2009. She was a music major at "K." She married Verlyn Harris in 1947, and they had three children. She was a homemaker and owned and operated her own music store, The Music Mart, in Goshen, Ind. Harris also taught piano for many years and worked at Salem Bank in Goshen. She was a member of First Presbyterian Church, where she played piano, the Federated Women's Club, and Sigma Eta Fine Arts Sorority. Harris was a well-known accompanist and producer of musical programs.
Daniel Nichoson ’48 died on January 28, 2009. The Grand Rapids (Mich.) native majored in economics at Kalamazoo College and went on the serve 36 years in the U.S. Army (active and reserves), from which he retired with the rank of Major. He worked as a sales representative and technical assistance manager for several commercial and institutional furniture companies. He loved to travel and was an avid snow skier, scuba diver, and golfer. One particular passion (which started as a student at "K") was playing tuba in dance bands. He continued to play until just a year for his death, splitting time between a Dixieland jazz band and an Octoberfest band. His son Terry wrote, "My father told me many times how much he enjoyed attending Kalamazoo College, playing football and playing the tuba in bands."
Bruce Bowman ’49 died on January 9, 2009. He majored in sociology at Kalamazoo College and was a member of Phi Lambda and Kappa Delta Chi. He also served on the College's Religious Affairs Committee. After graduation, Bowman did graduate work at Yale University. He was a self-employed jewelry craftsman.
John Dunlap ’49 died on October 21, 2008. He lived in Riverside, Calif., at the time of his death.
John Jurgensen ’49 died on February 12, 2009. After graduating from Dowagiac High School he served in the U.S. Navy during World War II. At "K" he majored in economics. After graduation he worked for 40 years as a partner in the John Keyser Agency in Kalamazoo.

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1950's

L. David Carley ’50 died on May 13, 2009. He grew up in Detroit, where he excelled in high school athletics, earning letters in four sports. He was accepted to Colgate University but chose to attend Kalamazoo College. He entered as an undergraduate member of the class of 1950, considering a career in the ministry, but he earned his bachelor's degree from Western Michigan University. He earned a master's degree from "K" in public administration in 1951 and completed his Ph.D. in political science and constitutional law at the University of Wisconsin in 1959. His career seemed headed for politics. In the early 1950s he was personnel director and assistant city manager in Kalamazoo. In 1959 Wisconsin Governor Gaylord Nelson appointed Carley to direct the newly created state Department of Resource Development (now the Department of Natural Resources), and Carley started the Wisconsin Department of Local Affairs and Development (now the Department of Commerce). His interest in government continued and spurred three unsuccessful bids for elective office as a Democrat-for lieutenant governor in 1962, and for governor in 1966 and 1978. Carley served as president of Continental Mortgage Insurance Corporation from 1962 to 1966 and then founded and became president of Public Facilities Associates, Inc. That company developed government-supported housing and urban development projects and was purchased by Inland Steel Company in 1970. Carley became president of Inland's development corporation but in 1974, with his brother Jim, formed the urban development and venture capital firm Carley Capital Group. The firm became known for its innovative practices and for completing projects that many believed could not be done. It did real estate projects not only in Wisconsin, but also in Michigan, Maryland, California, North Carolina, South Carolina, and China. Carley moved to Washington, D.C. in 1980 to become president of the National Association for Public Television Stations. He also served as a member of the University of Wisconsin Board of Regents and president of the Medical College of Wisconsin. He also served on the boards of the Folger Shakespeare Library, the Kennedy Presidential Library, and the Wisconsin Power and Light Company. One of his dearest duties was the Kalamazoo College Board of Trustees, on which he served from 1980 to 1989. "He was a true disciple of 'K'," said Jody Clark '80. "He did amazing things, not the least of which was to launch my career in real estate."
Art Leighton ’50 died on May 19, 2008. He earned his degree in physical education and played on the men's tennis team and basketball team. He also was active in intramural sports and was a member of the "K" Club. After graduation Leighton owned and operated the A.L. Midwest Sports Company.
Lenore (Emigh) Sheldon ’50 died on January 25, 2009. She majored in English and was a member of the Bach Festival. After graduation she moved to California, where she raised her family. In her retirement years she lived in Utah and Colorado.
John Urbank ’51 died on November 15, 2008. During his undergraduate years served as vice president of Century Forum. He was a member of the Newman Club, the Social Committee, and WJMD. He also participated in intramural sports. Urbank graduated with a B.A. in sociology.
Catherine (Rutherford) McCann ’55 died on April 18, 2009. The Portland (Maine) native majored in history and sociology at "K" and was active in numerous student organizations. She was a member of Student Senate (vice president), Student Faculty Council, Eurodelphian Gamma (president), Inter-Society Council, Women's League Council, Trowbridge House Council (president), Index, and Boiling Pot (editor). When she moved to South Miami, Florida, she asked for a copy of the city's first comprehensive plan. Studying it sparked her interest in government. She served on several city boards, including environmental review, commercial development, and public relations. Then she ran for city commission and was elected in 1980. In 1990 she was elected mayor, the city's first female to hold that position, and she served two terms. As mayor, she stared a municipal recycling program, led efforts to build housing for seniors, directed resources to low-income areas of the city, and started after-school programs. She also served on the board of directors for Habitat for Humanity of Greater Miami and helped build 35 Habitat for Humanity homes in South Miami.

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1960's

Robert Tardiff ’63 died on July 16, 2008. He majored in physics and was a member of Century Forum and the Model Democratic Convention. He participated in intramural sports and was one of the pioneer students in foreign study, when that program occurred during the summer months. After graduating from Kalamazoo College he earned his M.B.A. at Western Michigan University. He enjoyed a long career in the paper manufacturing industry and, while working with the Simpson Paper Company (Plainwell, Mich.), often donated paper to the College. He was a member of many civic organizations and a volunteer firefighter and EMT. He was an enthusiastic naturalist and outdoorsman and enjoyed hiking, biking, kayaking, cross-country skiing, and cultivating wildflowers. He served as the naturalist at the Sarrett Nature Center in Benton Harbor, where schoolchildren knew him as "RoBEAR TARdeef," the French voyageur in the canoeing program. He was an avid birder, which coincided nicely with his lifelong love of travel. Birding led to trips to Mexico, South America, Europe, Iceland, and China. He also visited every state in the U.S.

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1970's

John Friedman ’72 died on April 2, 2009. He majored in psychology at "K" and later graduated from the University of Maryland School of Social Work with a master's degree. He was employed by Washington County Mental Health Department in Hagerstown, Maryland, until 2002. He is survived by three children and one grandchild.
Catherine Donckers ’78 died on April 25, 2009. She came to Kalamazoo College from Marquette, Mich., and graduated from "K" with degrees in French and psychology. She later received a master's degree in child development (1981) from Pacific Oaks College (Pasadena, Calif.). Donckers worked at the Pleasant Valley Outdoor Education Center (Woodstock, Ill.), the state of Texas Wilderness Challenge Program, and a photo finishing lab in Eugene, Ore. She was an accomplished photographer. She and her husband and their two children returned to Marquette from Eugene in September 2003.

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1980's

Phillippa Nunez ’81 died on January 20, 2009. She matriculated from Trinidad and Tobago, and was one of the first students from that country to attend Kalamazoo College. She graduated with honors, majoring in economics and mathematics. She was a member of the College archery team and the cross-country team. She studied abroad in Strasbourg, France. "She had," wrote her father, "the fondest memories of her time at college, of Professors Chen and Thomas, and of the year she spent in France." After graduating she returned home to work in the marketing department of Glamour Girl Lingerie. Later she was the senior associate consultant in her family's firm, Nunez, Nunez and Nunez Management Consultants. She remained fluent in French, oral and written, and was skilled in cake and pastry making, and art she perfected during her time in France.

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Friends

Emeral Crosby died on March 1, 2009, from complications encountered during surgery. Dr. Crosby served as a trustee of Kalamazoo College from 1988 to 2006, after which he was honored with Emeritus Trustee status.
Barbara Filner died on February 24, 2009. She served as assistant professor of biology at Kalamazoo College from 1976 to 1978. After leaving the College she settled in the Washington, D.C. area to become director of health sciences policy at the National Academy of Sciences' Institute of Medicine. There, she directed studies on a range of topics, including mandatory retirement for airline pilots, alcoholism, and medical education. She was a former national president of the Association for Women in Science and head of its educational foundation, which provided hundreds of scholarships to female high school students and graduate students seeking careers in science. She retired in 2001, after serving 13 years as a senior program officer specializing in graduate fellowships, research resources, and international research programs at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.
David Upton died on January 31, 2009. He was a member of the Kalamazoo College Board of Trustees from 1968 to 1986. The oldest son of Frederick S. Upton, co-founder of the Whirlpool Corporation, David was a veteran of World War II, engineer, purchasing director, businessman, and state lawmaker. He also was prominent in the Michigan wine industry. In 1978 he bought Tabor Hill Winery (Buchanan, Mich.) and turned it into a model fro the rest of the industry. He was a key mover for the establishment of the Michigan Grape & Wine Industry Council in 1985. He was a visionary who saw the potential for winery tourism and became a founding member of the Southwest Michigan Tourist Council.

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