September 2011

CLASS NOTES

1940's | 1950's | 1960's | 1970's | 1980's | 1990's | 2000's | Friends | In Memory

1940's

John Polzin ’47 and his wife, Kay, have been honored with the Kalamazoo Rotary Club's Red Rose Citation, an award that celebrates exceptional contributions to the city outside the recipients' primary professions. Through their dedicated support of the YMCA, Bronson Hospital, and their place of worship, John and Kay have shown deep interest in the state of the community, acting as leaders and mentors. This leadership extends to "K," where John served on the Emeritus Club and as a Class agent. In 2006, he received the Emeritus Club Citation of Merit, the College's award for extraordinary loyalty and participation in College activities.

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1960's

Don Schneider ’63 wrote, "On May 5, en route to Chattanooga for a tandem bicycle rally, Jean and I stopped in Loudon, Tennessee, and joined Bob and Sue (Wotila) Brackenridge for brunch. Bob and Sue moved to Loudon after Bob retired from multiple terms in the Michigan Legislature. (With 'Lincoln' as his middle name, he was a natural for politics!) Not surprisingly, both Bob and Sue are active in Loudon community affairs." Bob and Don are classmates and were roommates for all their four years together at "K." Sue is a member of the Class of 1965. Pictured are (l-r): Don, Bob, and Sue.
Susan Reinhart ’67 retired this year from the University of Michigan where she taught in the English Language Institute for 30 years. She received a M.A. degree in linguistics from the University of Michigan in 1978 and graduated cum laude from the University of Detroit Law School in 1993. Her recent texts include Strategies for Legal Case Reading and Vocabulary Development, Giving Academic Presentations, and Academic Interactions. Her work, studies, and travel have taken her to more than 20 countries. She was a recent volunteer at Casa Materna, a waiting home in Matagalpa, Nicaragua, for at-risk pregnant mothers from rural areas. She is a gardener, hiker, and camper and has recently taken up birding and counting butterflies.
Linda Rodd ’67 has retired from teaching psychology at Champlain College. She and her husband, David Jacobowitz, are enjoying life in Vermont. Linda's new e-mail address is lj.rodd@gmail.com.

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1970's

Bob Cinabro ’70 will run for one of seven open seats on the Kalamazoo City Commission in November. He was appointed to the Commission last year to finish the term of the late Terry Kuseske. This will be Cinabro's first run for elective office. He worked in the Kalamazoo City Attorney's office for more than 30 years, 17 of which he served as City Attorney.
Timothy Howlett, ’70 an attorney in the law firm of Dickinson Wright, has been named a "Leader in the Field" of labor and employment law by Chambers USA, publisher of the world's leading guide to the legal profession. He is recognized for his counseling in all aspects of employment law and employment litigation, especially his recent handling of a disability discrimination matter for a major restaurant chain.
Patricia (Yates) Lincoln ’70 has retired as the provost and dean of faculty at Coker College. Her work in that position earned her the International Association of Administration Professionals 2010 Boss of the Year. She started work at Coker as a visiting professor slated to stay for just one semester, but ended up spending 25 years as a biology professor before moving on to her administrative position. Lincoln has received numerous accolades over the course of her career: Coker's students chose her as Master Professor; the South Carolina Commission on Higher Education declared her a Distinguished Professor; and the South Carolina Independent Colleges and Universities honored her with its Excellence in Teaching Award. She lives in Columbia, S.C. with her husband David Lincoln '66.
Paul Shapiro ’70 was recently honored by the Arts School Network for leading the 2011 Outstanding Arts Program in the U.S. He also recently wrapped filming Ira Finkelstein's Christmas with Eliot Gould. The film is set for a November release. Paul is pictured (back row, at left) with Gould (back row, center).
David Thoms ’70 has been re-elected to a one-year term as president of the board of directors of Alliance Francaises de Grosse Pointe, an organization that celebrates French culture, past and present. Thoms did his foreign study in Caen, France. He is a principal in the law firm Miller Canfield, working at the firm's Troy, Michigan, office. He is a member of the firm's Personal Services Group and co-leader of the Nonprofit and Charitable Organizations Group.
Paul Guenette ’74 is senior vice president for corporate affairs at ACDI/VOCA, a nonprofit that links farmers to markets in developing countries. Guenette provides leadership to corporate planning, relationships with external corporations, and public-private partnerships. He has designed and managed large, integrated, sustainable development programs in a career spanning 35 years and 59 countries. His experience includes resident long-term assignments in Senegal, Mauritania, Indonesia, Barbados, and Kenya, where he led agribusiness programs incorporating policy reform, business group strengthening, commercial marketing, equity financing, and investment promotion. "The 'K' College foreign study really stuck with me!" he wrote.
Susan Dobrich ’76 has been appointed by Michigan Governor Rick Snyder to a three-year term on the Michigan Women's Commission. Located in the Department of Civil Rights, the Commission works to improve the quality of life for Michigan women through leadership and partnership on key issues. Dobrich is the Cass County probate and family court judge. She previously served as the county's first female prosecutor. She served as a member of the Governor's Task Force and Executive Committee on Child Neglect and Abuse. Dobrich earned her law degree from the Thomas M. Cooley Law School.
Dave Stone ’76 and his wife, Marty (Staff) Stone '76 had a chance to reunite recently with classmate Bonnie (Damask) Frenkel '76 when they were in New York City in July 2011 to celebrate the wedding of Dave and Marty's daughter, Charmie. Dave and Marty live in The Woodlands, Texas, and Bonnie lives in Orlando, Florida, with her husband, Tracey Frenkel. Pictured are (l-r): Dave, Marty, and Bonnie.
Mary Jo Hinsdale ’77 earned her Ph.D. in philosophy of education from the University of Utah. Mary Jo is director of the McNair Scholars Program at Westminster College in Salt Lake City. McNair is a federally-funded program that provides services to low-income, first-generation, and underrepresented students who wish to pursue graduate studies. The students with whom she has had the privilege to work during the last eight years inspired her dissertation: Responsive Mentor, Transformative Mentorship. The first Westminster McNair Scholars to enter graduate schools have earned doctorates at University of Minnesota, Harvard University, Boston University, and Northwestern University. Others are progressing through their programs at prestigious schools including Stanford University, the University of California system (San Diego, Santa Barbara, Santa Cruz, San Francisco, and Berkeley), University of Arizona, Oxford University, and Georgetown University. As the next generation of university faculty members and researchers, they will help transform the academy by creating a more inclusive climate and bringing new perspectives. Mary Jo and John Robandt '75 have been married for 11 years and live in Salt Lake City. John is the customer service and purchasing manager for Fiero Fluid Power. Old friends, or (says John) anyone who still wonders what she ever saw in him, are welcome to contact them. Email jrobandt@gmail.com
Kathryn VandenBosch (Ph.D.) ’77 is one of three finalists for Dean of the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She earned her B.A. in biology at "K" and is currently professor and head of the Department of Plant Biology at the University of Minnesota in St. Paul. VandenBosch's research focuses on the genetics of plant-microbe interactions and nitrogen fixation in legumes. She is also active in university governance as a member and former chair of the Faculty and Senate Consultative Committees and, in 2006, served as interim dean of the College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences. Prior to her tenure at the University of Minnesota, VandenBosch was a faculty member at Texas A&M University for a dozen years. She holds M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in botany from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst. Of his former student, Professor Emeritus of Biology Paul Olexia wrote, "Kate has had a terrific career at Texas A&M and at University of Minnesota. On top of that, she is just really a nice person. I can think of no one more deserving for this Dean's position. She was one of the original (first-year) LandSea participants, and her leadership skills were apparent even then."
Nancy Sherman ’79 is the creative director of Business Success Unlimited, a Three Rivers, Michigan-based support center for the small business community in Southwest Michigan. Nancy lived in the Washington, D.C., metro area for 30 years where she managed businesses for both herself and for her clients. While there, she operated one of the first executive suites, along with a business referral group, for many years.

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1980's

Paul Anderson ’81 has been head coach of the Los Alamos (N.M.) Girls Track and Field team since 1999. This year's team won the state championship! It was the third consecutive state championship for Anderson's teams.
Jennifer (Lieffers) Reibel ’81 has joined Lessiter Publications in Brookfield, Wis., as managing editor of Farm Equipment, Rural Lifestyle Dealer, and the Farm Catalog. Jennifer has more than 20 years of business writing experience with CNH Global, Edelman Public Relations, Kohler Co., Farm Futures magazine and The Milwaukee Business Journal. She lives in Bay View, Wis., with her husband and their two children.
Pam Wetzel ’81 has been promoted to credit administration officer at the Bank of Ann Arbor (Mich.) where she has worked since 1999. Her duties include underwriting and preparing many board-level loan credit summaries. Pam is active in the community helping with financial analysis at United Way and with her church where she board chair. She earned an M.B.A. from Cal State Northridge.
Hashem Akhavan-Tafti (Ph.D.) ’82 received the American Association for Clinical Chemistry Edwin F. Ullman Award. It is one of AACC's major awards and celebrates contributions through the development of new technologies and analytical methods. Akhavan-Tafti is vice president of research for Beckman Coulter's immunoassay and molecular diagnostics business group. He holds more than 70 U.S. patents and more than 100 international patents related to chemiluminescent substrates used in medical diagnostic assays. These inventions have had a profound impact on the field of medical diagnostics. Substrates he invented are used worldwide in automated systems in ultrasensitive assays in life-science research and human identity testing. More than a billion tests are conducted annually using these substrates.
Janet (Severance) Hahn ’82 was appointed coordinator for Western Michigan University's (WMU) new Center for Gerontology. Hahn was a psychology major at "K" and earned a Ph.D. in sociology from University of Minnesota. She has extensive experience in the health care field, and in her new position will promote gerontology education, research, and community service. She hopes to reinstate the university's gerontology minor (dropped in 2004 due to budget cuts) and institute a graduate level certificate program in the near future.
David Higdon ’83 has been named managing director of NASCAR's newly formed Integrated Marketing Communications department. He joins NASCAR from the Ladies Professional Golf Associaton (LPGA), where he oversaw corporate communications, stakeholder and media relations, player promotion, and TV and digital media content. He also served on the World Golf Hall of Fame advisory board. Prior to the LPGA, Higdon worked in open-wheel racing, professional tennis and basketball, and served in writing and editing roles for The New York Times, ESPN The Magazine, and other media outlets. At NASCAR Higdon will play a key leadership role in the development of communications strategy and in overseeing and integrating communications initiatives across the company, with particular emphasis on competition. He also will be responsible for crises communications, public affairs initiatives, and providing counsel to executive leadership across NASCAR's various departments.
Mary VanderWeele ’83 is the current chair of the Beaverton (Ore.) School Board, having served on the board since 2007. She is an attorney, community volunteer, and soccer coach, currently employed at Nike. She has served on the Washington County Commission on Children and Families and clerked for the U.S. Court of Appeals. She has two children in the Beaverton schools. She earned her law degree from the University of Michigan.
Harvey Hollins (III) ’87 has been appointed by Michigan Governor Rick Snyder as director of the Michigan Office of Urban and Metropolitan Initiatives, advising the governor on the economic development needs of cities, including business attraction, entrepreneurial start-ups and public transit. Harvey had most recently served as vice president for government and community affairs at Wayne State University. He had previously worked as the Michigan government affairs representative for the American Association of Retired Persons and as a fiscal analyst for the state House of Representatives. He holds a master's degree from the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy at University of Michigan.
Gila Dorostkar (D.D.S.) ’88 is a Board Certified Pediatric Specialist and Fellow of the American College of Dentists who began practicing in Marin County (Calif.) in 1997. Her recently dedicated pediatric dental facility in Greenbrae, Calif., is the first private funded pediatric dental office in the U.S. to be awarded LEED certification. The LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) was awarded by the U.S. Green Building Council and verified by the Green Building Certification Institute. Her practice (Gila C. Dorostkar, DDS) is also a member of the Eco-Dentistry Association and is scheduled to become a Charter-Certified GreenDOC dental practice. Some of the sustainable practices incorporated in the pediatric dentistry facility include: design for water use reduction; design for maximum daylighting, energy optimization, and use of green power; implementation of an extensive recycling program; use of automated lighting and HVAC controls; and site selection near mass transit systems and bicycle paths. Dorostkar is an advocate for children's health and has served in leadership roles in the California Society of Pediatric Dentistry and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry. She donates her expertise by treating children who might otherwise not have access to a pediatric specialist, and she supports numerous local school foundations and children's programs. In recognition of her leadership in these and other such efforts in the field, Dorostkar was recently inducted as a Fellow of the American College of Dentists. Fellows are nominated by their peers based on outstanding contribution to dentistry, oral health care, dental research, dental education, the profession, and society.

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1990's

Crystal (Caruana) Sullivan ’92 has been promoted to director of campus ministry at the University of Dayton. She has been a pastoral minister for 17 years. Sullivan is the first lay leader (non-ordained as a priest) and first woman to be named for the director position, which she began July 1. Since 2004 Sullivan has served as associate director of campus ministry for residence life ministry and the graduate assistant program. She also teaches graduate courses for the master of pastoral ministry program. Sullivan enjoys a national reputation in the campus ministry field. In 2008 she chaired a national team that developed a symposium for campus ministers at Catholic universities and colleges. For six years she served on the staff, then directed, the Campus Ministry Leadership Institute, a ministry training experience for campus ministry leaders sponsored by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops. Sullivan was a double major at "K"--religion and biology, and wrote, "I still remember when I told Dr. [Paul] Sotherland that I was not moving on in biology. That was a hard time, but I have truly found my vocation and it is great....I am who I am because of my time at 'K.'"
David Johnson ’95 has been elected to the Stulberg String Competition Board of Directors. The Stulberg Competition promotes excellence in string instrument performance by gifted young artists under the age of 20. It is best known for its annual international juried string competition, as well as the local concerts and educational events it holds throughout the year in western Michigan. Johnson is an attorney in the Intellectual Property and Technology Practice Group in the Corporate and Securities Department of the law firm Honigman Miller Schwartz and Cohn LLP.
Christa Clapp ’97 and Andre Aasrud are proud to announce the birth of their daughter, Nora Esther. Her middle name honors her great-grandmother Esther Clapp, a 1932 Kalamazoo College graduate. The family lives in Paris, France, where Christa works for the Organisation of Economic Cooperation and Development, providing climate change policy analysis for governments around the world.
Amy Trenkle ’97 received the Mount Vernon Estate's History Teacher of the Year Award. The award, sponsored by an endowment established by the Robertson Foundation, rewards the merits of D.C.-area history teachers. Amy has been an eighth-grade history teacher at Stuart-Hobson Middle School in Washington, D.C., since 1999. She receives a cash prize of $5,000 (some of which will go right back to her classroom, she says) and an all-expenses-paid field trip to the Mount Vernon Estate (which will also include her class.) Amy is also an adjunct professor at American University and won the 2005 D.C. History Teacher of the Year Award.
Erin Killian ’99 is a producer for Digital News at NPR, and the host of a blog on NHPR. At NPR she works primarily with All Things Considered and the national desk. She has worked on the DuPont Award-winning York Project and written about the European debt crisis. An English major at "K," she has been employed at such publications as The Washington Business Journal, McKnight's Long-Term Care News, and Forbes Magazine.

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2000's

Patrick Ellis ’01 has joined the law firm of Rhoades McKee, P.C., in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Before joining the firm he was an associate principal with Kitch Drutchas Wagner Valitutti & Sherbrook. At Rhoades McKee, Ellis focuses his practice in the areas of medical malpractice and general litigation.
Carla Kupe-Arion ’02 and her husband, Mason Arion, welcomed their daughter to the world. Layla Marie Arion was born on April 30, 2011.
Elise (Strazzinski) Rosch ’02 is a third-grade teacher at Spangdahlem Elementary School, a U.S. Department of Defense school in Germany. She was recently selected as the 2012 Kaiserlautern District Teacher of the Year! Wrote her superintendent: "Her tie of common electronic assessments to the standards and standards-based instruction certainly enhances the good work she is doing in her school, and it is a model to be emulated. Including standards in the student data binders is a way to ensure that they are involved in the progress of their learning. This is outstanding work, and another model to be emulated because it is a highly regarded part of the comprehensive assessment program."
Steve Shelden ’04 completed a residency in internal medicine at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., and was ordered to report to San Diego for duty as Senior Medical Officer, USS Pearl Harbor (LSD 52). He will be responsible for the overall health and wellness of some 700 sailors and marines when the ship deploys this fall to southeast Asia and the Arabian Gulf in support of humanitarian activities and the global war on terror.
Laura Poskey-Paul ’05 accepted a position of account supervisor at AbelsonTaylor, the largest independent advertising agency in the healthcare field. She previously worked for Corbett Accel Healthcare Group, handling a wide variety of pharmaceuticals at all stages of their development and use. An art major at "K," she is an active member of the Art Institute of Chicago and the Museum of Contemporary Art.
Steve Yeun ’05 is back as pizza delivery guy turned hero Glenn in the second season of The Walking Dead, the hit zombie drama on cable television's AMC. When the 13-episode season begins (in Oct.), fans will see Glenn get a love interest named Maggie (Lauren Cohan from Chuck and Supernatural).
Kimberly Yourchock ’05 has joined the Detroit office (Southfield, Mich.) of Jackson Lewis LLP, on the country's largest and fastest growing workplace law firms. She is an associate in the firm and is pictured at left.
Kelly Houseal ’08 and her husband, Ian Haight '08, teach at Watervliet (Mich.) High School. Kelly teaches math; Ian is the librarian. Both are products of the Kalamazoo College education program. After graduation they spent a year in Beijing, China, teaching English to elementary school children.
Thomas Nudell ’09 was awarded a U.S. Department of State Critical Language Scholarship (CLS) to study Chinese in China during the summer of 2011. He was one of some 575 undergraduate and graduate students to receive a scholarship from the CLS Program. More than 5,200 persons applied. Nudell is a grad student at North Carolina State University (Raleigh). The CLS Program provides fully-funded, group-based intensive language instruction and structured cultural enrichment experiences. CLS Program participants continue their language study beyond the scholarship and apply their critical language skills in their future professional careers. CLS Program languages include Arabic, Azerbaijani, Bangla/Bengali, Chinese, Hindi, Korean, Indonesian, Japanese, Persian, Punjabi, Russian, Turkish, and Urdu.

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2010's

Colleen McIntee ’11 completed a Senior Individualized Project that was a study in arts management, entrepreneurship, and educational circus models. As part of that work (completed for the Economics and Business Department) she wrote a business model for Circus in the 'ZOO, a program designed to promote circus arts as a form of physical fitness and creative expression in the Kalamazoo-area community. The program also fosters trust, promotes positive self-esteem, and gives an opportunity for teamwork to participants of any age and skill-level. The pilot version of Circus in the 'ZOO occurred at the Fire Historical and Cultural Arts Collaborative in Portage (Mich.) last spring. The program lasted four weeks and was instructed by members of Cirque du K, the Kalamazoo College circus club. Participants (ages 15-65) worked on ground circus skills, including juggling, diabolo, partner acrobatics, feather balancing, comedy, and team building skills four hours each week. The program finished with a showcase event that displayed various acts in the skill areas. Cirque du K hopes to implement the program in schools, businesses, and community cultural events. "What I love about circus arts," says McIntee, "is that there is something for everyone. If you have difficulty juggling (like I do), maybe you are a great balancer or have a knack for partner acrobatics. Maybe you are funny or great at coming up with creative costumes. Circus arts have taught me how to be strong, confident, and creative while having fun and working with other people to create something beautiful." McIntee is working on a master's degree at the University of Michigan's School of Education this year. "I would like to certify in physical education and be able to bring circus arts education into the mainstream curriculum of our PE classrooms."

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In Memory

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1930's

Lorraine (Russell) Evenhuis ’36 died April 22, 2011, at age 95. She was born in Trowbridge, Mich., and raised within the state before graduating from Kalamazoo College with a B.A. in history and beginning a career with AT&T.
Jack Hartung ’38 died June 21, 2011, at age 94. A naval officer during World War II, a business executive, and a big band musician, Hartung grew up in Kalamazoo and later moved to Greenville, S.C., where he was involved with the John Knox Presbyterian Church and enjoyed classes at Osher Lifetime Learning at Furman University.

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1940's

W.C. "Bud" Hunter ’41 died July 5, 2011, at age 92. Bud worked for many years in the paper industry, rising to the level of general plant manager. He followed older sister Klair (Hunter) Bates '39 to Kalamazoo College and was followed by younger sister Jane (Hunter) Parker '48. Bud was a member of the 1940 Hornet tennis team that was inducted into the "K" Athletic Hall of Fame. He enjoyed tennis and played until he was 90.

Carlton Moore ’41 died May 31, 2011. He graduated from Kalamazoo College with a B.A. in biology and then attended Wayne State Medical School before serving in the Army during World War II. After leaving the military, he worked for Abbott Pharmaceuticals. After his career at Abbott, Moore retired to Florida, where he golfed, played a number of musical instruments, and cheered for the Nebraska Cornhuskers. He belonged to a number of organizations, including the Masonic Lodge, the VFW, and the American Legion, among others.
Matthew VanKeuren ’41 died June 14, 2011. He earned his B.A. at "K" in economics and business. He entered the U.S. Navy in 1944 and saw action in Japan, Korea, and the Republic of Congo, a long military career that earned him various honors including the American Defense Medal and Korean Service Medal. When he wasn't on tour, he taught for the National Reserve Officer Training Corps in Atlanta, Honolulu, and Sacramento.
Eric Pratt ’42 died on May 26, 2011, at age 91. He studied chemistry and played tennis at "K" before serving in the Navy aboard the destroyer, USS Valette, in the Pacific. He had a long career at the Upjohn Company in Kalamazoo and volunteered his time and skills to many organizations, including the Red Cross, Care-A-Van, Meals on Wheels, and the People's Church. Survivors include his wife, Patricia (Miller) Pratt '47.
Marian (Wilson) Simmons ’42 died May 18, 2011, in Novi, Michigan. She was 91 years old. Marian matriculated to Kalamazoo College along with high school sweetheart Luel Simmons '42. They married in 1943. At "K," Marian was Editor-in-Chief of the Index and a staff member for the Boiling Pot. She was a member of the Student Senate, the College Singers, and Kappa Pi. She also worked in the College's communication office during her student years writing news releases for the College. She was invited to continue that work as a full-time employee after she graduated but declined the position. Marian was listed in Who's Who of American College and University Students. Throughout her life she continued a close relationship with Kalamazoo College, a relationship that eventually stretched to seven decades! She spent two years working with Hayden Ambrose in the College's advancement department as the primary fundraiser for the Paul Lamont Thompson Memorial Lecture Series. She served as class agent for the Class of 1942 for 46 years. She also was a member of the Women's Council, the Stetson Society, the 1833 Society, the Alumni Executive Board, and the Emeritus Club. Marian and Luel served as co-presidents of the Emeritus Club for four years. She was honored with the Kalamazoo College Distinguished Service Award and the Kalamazoo College Emeritus Club Citation of Merit. Marian also worked tirelessly to encourage students to attend Kalamazoo College. A recent example is Aidis Tuxhari '09, who distinguished herself as a leader in the Kalamazoo College Guilds Initiative. Marian and Luel established for students the Luel and Marian Simmons Scholarship Fund. The couple loved to travel and, in true "K" spirit, did so extensively. Survivors besides Luel include the couple's daughter Marylu (Simmons) Andrews '66.
Betty (Shayman) Johnson-Geyer ’45 died August 8, 2011, in Sun City Center, Fla., after a long illness. She was 87. Elected May Queen her senior year, Betty married fellow "K" student Robert A. Johnson '47, who died in 1998. She was president of the Kalamazoo chapter of the American Association of University Women and, after moving to Pleasantville, New York, in 1961, she became active in the Presbyterian Church. She was also a stringer for the Mount Kisco Patent Trader.
Janet (MacKenzie) Cantwell ’47 died on May 15, 2011. She was 84. Born and raised in Michigan, Janet earned her B.A. degree in biology and chemistry at "K" and a certificate of medical technology from Women's Hospital in Detroit. She and her family moved to Albuquerque, N.M., in 1955. In 1968 she moved to Roswell, where she became a supervisor of the Income Support Division for the State of New Mexico Human Services Department.
Peter Dyksterhouse (Sr.) ’48 died June 19, 2011. He served in the Army during World War II and then earned a B.A. in history from "K." He later earned an M.A. from the University of Michigan. Dyksterhouse enjoyed a long career in public education as a teacher, principal, and assistant superintendent in Kalamazoo Public Schools. He was passionate about music, serving as a soloist, choir director, organist, and guest musician for many Kalamazoo churches.
John Leslie White ’48 died May 9, 2011. He earned a B.A. in chemistry and M.S. in organic chemistry from Kalamazoo College and worked as a pharmaceutical chemist for the Upjohn Company in Kalamazoo. He later earned a J.D. (with honors) from the George Washington University Law School before embarking on a long career in intellectual property law. His list of achievements include co-founding the Arlington (Va.) intellectual property law firm of Millen, White, Zelano & Branigan; authoring the textbook Chemical Patent Practice; and serving as Chairman of the American Intellectual Property Law Association Chemical Practice Committee. During his retirement, he was a featured singer with the Humboldt Light Opera Company.
June (Weaver) Kauffman ’49 died on August 15, 2011, in Sawyer, Mich. She was 84. She was a longtime resident of Sturgis, Mich., where she was active in the First Presbyterian Church, Junior Women's League, and Sturgis Women's Club. She taught elementary school in nearby White Pigeon for 25 years. June enjoyed reading, knitting, traveling to lighthouses throughout the United States, and gathering with family members.

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1950's

Leslie (Vermeulen) Eichelberg ’52 died July 21, 2011, in Kalamazoo, at age 81. She was a free spirit, world traveler, and cancer survivor who spent much of her time volunteering for organizations such as the Weavers Guild, Junior League, John Dunning Guild, Kalamazoo Art League, First Presbyterian Church Health Clinic, and South Ridge Reformed Church. She made jewelry, wove baskets, dabbled in photography, and created award-winning macrame.
John (Jack) Foster ’52 died January 25, 2011. He matriculated to "K" from Grand Rapids, and graduated magna cum laude from the College. He attended Harvard University then served in the U.S. Army Security Agency, primarily in Germany. He returned to academia and received his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Michigan. Foster taught American Literature at Roosevelt University in Chicago and was a research associate with the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago. He focused on ancient Egyptian literature and published extensively in his field, including books of translations from hieroglyphs to English such as Love Songs of the New Kingdom and Echoes of Egyptian Voices. He was an active member of the Society for the Study of Egyptian Voices and the American Research Center in Egypt. He edited the latter's journal, JARCE, for several years. He is survived by his wife, Gloria (Wallace) Foster '53, and their three children.
Charles Maltby ’53 died June 9, 2011. A Kalamazoo native, Maltby earned his B.A. in chemistry at "K" and Western Michigan University, all the while developing a passion for art that would lead him to the field of architecture. He worked as a draftsman for Kingscott's, a local firm, while studying architecture from home. After becoming a registered architect, he was employed at several firms and eventually retired from Diekema Hamann in 1987. He was an outdoors enthusiast who documented his hikes through Yellowstone with the same sharp eye and attention to detail that served him professionally.
James Allison Cameron (III) ’54 of Wirtz, W.Va., died Sunday, July 31, 2011, at age 79. He owned and operated Cameron's News in One Lincoln Center, Syracuse, N.Y., retiring in 1995 to move to Albany, N.Y. In Albany, he administered the FOCUS Food Pantry before moving to the Smith Mountain Lake area of West Virginia in 2001. Jim served as the coordinator/director of Lake Christian Ministries and was a member of the advisory committee of Feeding America--Southwest Virginia. He was a Rotarian for 26 years and was also an avid wood turner.
Lloyd Johnson ’54 died June 5, 2011. He attended Kalamazoo College where he played football. He left "K" to enlist in the Marines. He served three years and received several miliary awards. Johnson was the second African-American fireman hired by the City of Kalamazoo, and the first African-American to reach the rank of firefighter. He retired from the department after 25 years. Johnson was an active member of the community, involved with the Kalamazoo Public Schools, the Northside Rocket football program, and the NAACP.
David Koeze ’58 died June 29, 2011, at age 75. After he graduated from "K," Dave attended Western Michigan University and Michigan State University, receiving an M.A. degree in education. A Wyoming Public Schools retiree, he began his career as a biology teacher and was soon promoted to assistant principal at Newhall Junior High school. Later he accepted the position of assistant director of Wyoming Community Education. He also served many summers with the National Park Service in the Pacific Northwest, spending most of his time fighting fires and giving evening nature walks to campers. He also managed the family horse farm until it was sold to become Rivertown Crossings.

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1960's

Linda (Brenneman) Schneider ’61 died Aug. 17, 2011, after a brief illness. Linda earned her master of library science degree from Indiana University and worked as a librarian for many years before she retired from the Louisiana State University Hill Memorial Library Special Collections, in Baton Rouge. She was an active member of Baton Rouge Area Volunteers for Opera, LSU Patrons of the Opera, and the Baton Rouge chapter of Ikebana International. She was predeceased by her husband, Don W. Schneider '61, whom she met during "K" study abroad in Spain.
David Heath ’64 died Thursday, August 11, 2011, at Highland Hospital in Rochester, NY. David received M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in mathematics at the University of Illinois in Urbana. A noted professor of applied mathematics, David co-authored a seminal model for the term structure of interest rates known as the Heath-Jarrow-Morton (HJM) framework, which placed him in continuous demand for speaking and teaching engagements worldwide. He taught at the University of Minnesota, Cornell University, University of California at Berkeley, University of Strasbourg (France), and Carnegie Mellon University. He consulted on a wide range of projects for public and private entities: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (on the risk of dam failure), Department of Energy (on the risk of nuclear waste disposal), IBM, Credit Suisse, and others. David also served on the board of directors for Lehman Brothers Financial Products.
John Barnhart ’65 died July 4, 2011, at age 68. After graduating from "K" with a B.A. in economics, he went on to a long career as an accounting manager for General Foods in Memphis, Tenn., and White Plains, N.Y., as well as W.G. Moe & Sons and Hamilton Engines in Oregon. His study abroad experience in France gave him a lifelong passion for the country, and he would return there many times. Barnhart spent the last 13 years of his life in Milwaukie, Ore.

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1970's

Kurt Ostling ’74 died from heart failure on May 12, 2011. He was a division manager for the Labatt Brewing Company until 1999 when he purchased the Timber Ridge Golf Course in East Lansing. Ostling earned his B.A. degree in political science, and he played three years of varsity basketball for the Hornets. He pursued a lifelong passion for basketball, traveling the country to watch games. He was a philanthropist who supported the Brain Cancer Research Program at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Roscommon County Community Foundation, Roscommon Animal Shelter, Cincinnati Arts Association, and Mt. Auburn Presbyterian Church.

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1980's

Kevin Mack (M.D.) ’80 died on July 14, 2011, in a shuttle bus collision with a semi-trailer. He was a passenger in the bus on its way to San Francisco General Hospital (SFGH). Mack earned his B.A. in health sciences and studied abroad in Strasbourg, France. He earned his medical degree at the University of Hawaii. Mack was an associate professor in the University of California-San Francisco (UCSF) department of psychiatry and an expert in bipolar and psychotic disorders. He worked with the World Health Organization developing problem-based learning programs for use in Africa and the South Pacific. He served as an advisory college mentor in the UCSF School of Medicine and as the director of Educational Technology in the UCSF-Berkeley Joint Medical Program. "He was a role model for his students and an inspiration for his colleagues," said UCSF School of Medicine Dean Sam Hawgood. "He had a strong commitment to global health and medical education in resource poor settings," said A. Sue Carlisle, associate dean of SFGH, with which UCSF is affiliated and where Mack based his work in bipolar and psychotic disorders. He is survived by his husband and two young children.
Joseph Gallagher (II) ’86 died June 6, 2011. At "K" he majored in theatre arts and volunteered as a counselor for young students. After graduation he received a scholarship for Southern Methodist University and worked as a software quality control technician for Amazon and Microsoft. He was passionate about his work, gourmet cooking, and fine wine.
William Charles Smith ’89 of Saline, Mich., died July 23, 2011. Bill worked briefly as a gift officer at "K" before beginning a nearly 20-year career in the automotive industry, almost entirely for the Burke E. Porter Machinery Company based in Grand Rapids. While at "K" he met Kathleen Reus '88 and they were married June 22, 1992. They began their lives together in Kalamazoo, then moved to Grand Rapids, and eventually settled in the Ann Arbor area where they've lived for many years. On March 18, 2010, he suffered a significant brain injury as a result of a fall and cardiac event. He was in hospitals, skilled nursing rehabilitation, and adult foster care thereafter. Since May 2010, his most important job of his life was therapy, and he gave it his all, learning to walk, read, and think again. He never gave up, and was making progress to the end.

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Friends

George Acker professor emeritus of physical education, died on July 20, 2011. Coach Acker served as a coach and professor at Kalamazoo College for 35 years (1958-93) and was inducted into the Kalamazoo College Athletic Hall of Fame in 1998. He coached men's tennis teams to seven NCAA Division III championships while winning 35 consecutive MIAA championships. His tennis teams were 537-231 overall and an incredible 209-1 in conference. He also served as head coach of the Hornet wrestling (1960-74) and cross-country (1985-88) teams, was line coach for the football team (1959-69), and served as the College's athletic trainer and director of intramurals at different times during his career. Most of all, he loved teaching. "Nothing has given me as much pleasure as teaching the students in my theory and activities classes," said Acker in 1985, when he accepted the Florence J. Lucasse Award for Excellence in Teaching, the faculty's highest honor. Coach Acker was ahead of his time in understanding the strength of girls in sports and the importance of girls competing. He coached his four daughters throughout their high school, college, and professional careers. His civic endeavors included directing the Kalamazoo City Tennis Program and the Kalamazoo College Tennis Camp, and serving as president of the Western Michigan Tennis Association. He also served as assistant director and associate referee for the USTA Boys 16 & 18 National Tennis Championships and was a volunteer with Meals on Wheels, the Shepherd's Center, and Ministry with Community. His awards were legion and included the College's Weimer K. Hicks Award (1999) for his contributions to the entire "K" community and the USTA's Green Jacket Award for his service to the tournament. He particularly cherished the USTA Tennis Family of the Year, which he and his family received in 1973.
Ursula Leonhardt, a long-time resident director for the study abroad program in Erlangen, Germany, died on September 17, 2011, in Darmstadt, where she had been living in a seniors' home since a fall in late spring in Erlangen. Beginning with the Erlangen program's inception in 1963 to her retirement as resident director some 30 years later, Dr. Leonhardt was a stalwart proponent of international education not only for Kalamazoo College and our many students who studied in Erlangen, but also for the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, where she was the director of the University's international office. A story on Frau Leonhardt and complete obituary will appear in the January 2012 issue of BeLight.
Joel Sportel died on August 1, 2011. For 36 years he served Kalamazoo College as a member of its Facilities Management unit. He was grounds and fleet manager at the time of his passing. Joel married Deia McCormick on October 12, 1985, and she and their daughter, Jori, survive. Joel loved sports and was an avid golfer and bowler. He managed and played recreational softball for many years. He attended Northpoint Church where he loved to hear Jori sing with the worship band.

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