September 2013

CLASS NOTES

1940's | 1950's | 1960's | 1970's | 1980's | 1990's | 2000's | Friends | In Memory

1960's

Chokwe Lumumba ’69 has been elected mayor of Jackson, Mississippi. An attorney and civil rights activist, Lumumba had served on Jackson's city council for the previous four years. He received approximately 85 percent of the vote against three independent candidates in the mayoral election. Jackson is Mississippi's capital city and has a population of approximately 175,000. Lumumba recently received a K visitor in the Mayor's Office when Professor Emeritus of Education Romeo Phillips made a visit to Jackson. Pictured are (l-r): Horace Bulger, Chokwe Lumumba, Romeo Phillips, and Pat Phillips.
Ann MacLachlan-Zaleski ’69 retired in April after almost 40 years of journalism. For more than 30 years she was the European bureau chief for McGraw-Hill/Platts' nuclear publications. She continues to live near Versailles and hopes to spend more time in Chamonix with her husband, Pierre, and family and friends.
Dave Weed ’69 was honored in February by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) as one of six national recipients of the Roadmaps to Health Prize. Dr. Weed received the Prize from RWJF President and CEO Risa Lavizzo-Mourey on behalf of Partners for a Healthier Community and the City of Fall River, Mass.

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1970's

David Thoms ’70 has been elected to a three-year term on the board of trustees of Madonna University (Livonia, Mich.).
Thoms has long been active in the educational community. His service includes being a longtime board member and current president of the Alliance Francaise de Grosse Pointe. He's a trustee and executive committee member of the Michigan Colleges Foundation and a former trustee of Kalamazoo College. He's also a Planned Giving Technical Advisor at Greenhills School (Ann Arbor, Mich.). He was previously involved in leadership and fundraising for the University of Michigan's Kellogg Eye Center and the University of Detroit-Mercy. He was honored with the Officier dans l'Ordre des Palmes Academiques by the French Government for his contributions to French culture and education. Thoms is a principal at Miller Canfield law firm (Troy, Mich.).
Nora (Tuttle) Brossard ’71 is now a residential sales and rental real estate agent with Coldwell Banker Bellmarc, based in the firm's Lexington Avenue office on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. A high end boutique brokerage, Bellmarc is the sole Manhattan affiliate of Coldwell Banker, the premier international real estate brand. Nora wrote, "I would like to extend a 5 percent commission discount on rental transactions to Kalamazoo College alumni and their sons and daughters who need brokerage assistance--and invite you to contact me any time with a real estate question, or just to chat."
Dana Ramish ’74 is the chief operating officer and executive vice president for Lutheran Social Services of New England (LSS). Ramish is a Fellow in the American College of Healthcare Executives and also serves on the Board of LeadingAge Massachusetts. LSS traces its roots back to 1872 and the opening of the Martin Luther Orphans' Home in West Roxbury, Massachusetts. Today, LSS improves the lives of children, youth and families; adults with developmental disabilities, mental illness and deafness; economically disadvantaged families; refugees and immigrants; and older adults through more than 60 programs throughout New England.
Bruce Johnson ’76 has a very appropriate nickname: "Frisbee." He was one of the original driving forces behind Kalamazoo College's prominence in Ultimate Frisbee. His love for Ultimate has never waned, and that's true for many students and alumni. Fortunately they have an outlet to continue to express that passion: the Kalamazoo Ultimate Disc League (KUDL). Pictured with "Frisbee" Johnson (far right) are fellow KUDLers (l-r) Meredith Edwards '15, Morgan Mariama Mahdavi '14, Woody Tauke '14, Adam Smith '11, Jacob Meyers '08, Stu Gulliver '90, and Chris Tower '85.
Dan Schwallie ’77 has published a half dozen articles over the past 12 months, including "The Split Personalities of 457(b) Nonqualified Plans," Journal of Deferred Compensation (Summer 2013); "Excluding Part-Time Employees Under the 403(b) Universal Availability Rules," Journal of Pension Planning & Compliance (Spring 2013); and "Nondiscriminatory Matching Contributions: More than Simply ACP Testing," Benefits Quarterly (First Quarter 2013). He is currently working on the 2014 Supplement to the Cash Balance Plan Answer Book, 2nd ed. (Wolters Kluwer Law & Business, New York: 2012). Dan can be contacted via Linked In.
Mary Ellen Geist ’78 wrote a moving piece that describes coming to terms with the passing of a loved one from Alzheimer's disease. The post appears on the blog of Maria Shriver and is titled An Invincible Summer. It beautifully entwines the metaphor of cleaning a lakeside cottage after its winter season of emptiness (at least of human inhabitants) with the return of the memories of a loved one before that person begin to lose his self to Alzheimer's. Mary Ellen is author of the book Measure of the Heart, which chronicles her experience as caretaker for her father during his struggle with the disease.
Mary (Miller) Burns ’79 retired from teaching music (band, choir, and general music, kindergarten through grade five) and Spanish in July 2010. She served 31 years in the public school system. She is currently enjoying retirement with Michael, her husband of 29 years. She also enjoys directing a church choir and spending time with her four grandchildren.

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1980's

Ann Stevens ’80 recently published her book Calvin Wooster Owen: Diary of a Nineteenth Century American, a transcribed diary of Owen (who lived from 1798 to 1880). The diary offers a colorful overview of life in upstate New York during the 19th century. Written to commemorate the Town of Penfield's bicentennial, the 232-page book contains numerous illustrations and informational sidebars describing the people, politics, and events that Owen discusses, as well as a timeline, maps, family tree, and an extensive index. To learn more, contact Ann at eastriveredit@frontiernet.net.
Bradley Boekeloo ’81 has been nominated to receive the American Academy of Health Behavior's most prestigious award, the 2014 Research Laureate. He is a faculty member in the University of Maryland Department of Health Education and the founding director of the University of Maryland Prevention Research Center. He earned his bachelor's degree in biology and studied abroad in Erlangen, Germany. After graduating from K he received his Master of Science degree in health policy and management in 1984, and his Doctor of Philosophy degree in behavioral sciences from The Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health. His research is widely cited and focuses in the areas of sexual risk reduction and STD/HIV prevention. He has been asked to serve as a research expert on many federal research review panels and has served on more than 33 NIH, CDC and other federal research review panels primarily related to STD/HIV prevention. He is on the editorial boards of two Public Health journals and has served as a reviewer for many journals. He has held many officer positions in national research associations. As a Research Laboratory and Graduate Program Director, he has developed and coordinated many research training programs, and taught and mentored many new research scientists. "I consider K an important contributor to my life and career," he wrote recently. "My thoughts of K also were sparked this year by the passing of Billie King [director of counseling] who had a profound influence on me during my time at K."
Jon Stryker ’82 was included on one of the quirkiest and most interesting Top 10 lists of 2013...well, at least indirectly. For the past five years, the International Institute for Species Exploration has issued a top 10 list of the most bizarre and just plain interesting new species discovered during the previous year. The 2013 list was issued on May 23, the 305th birthday of Swedish botanist Carolus Linnaeus, who created the modern system of plant and animal names and classifications. Included in this year's list was the Sneezing Monkey, rhinopithecus strykeri. R. strykeri is a snub-nosed monkey found in the mountains of Myanmar. It has mostly black fur and a white beard, and it sneezes when it rains. The species is critically endangered. Stryker is founder of the Arcus Foundation, which is dedicated, in part, to the preservation of great apes and primates in the wild. The new species was named to honor Stryker, and it shares the top 10 list with, among others, a venomous jellyfish, an underworld worm, and a fungus named for a TV cartoon. Scientists have so far discovered nearly 2 million species of the 8 to 12 million estimated to be living on earth (though some researchers think the number could be as high as 100 million). Each year about 15,000 to 20,000 new species are classified.
Doug Hentschel ’84 is an associate professor in mathematics and science and chair of the Department of Operations and Supply Chain Management at Northwood University (Midland, Mich.). In May he received the University's Faculty Excellence Award, the highest professional award given by the university.The award was established more than 30 years ago to be given to a faculty member who has made, over the year, an outstanding contribution to the University in his or her profession. Criteria include breadth and depth of knowledge, a genuine interest and skill at preparing students for career and social responsibilities, excitement of inquiry, commitment to diligence, the courage to innovate, the ability to work harmoniously with other professionals, and character which reflects the highest moral values. Hentschel earned his B.A. at K in mathematics and his master's degree from Clemson University.
John Bradford Jensen ’85 met with President Obama and Vice President Biden in January during the Insourcing American Jobs forum at the White House. Jensen joined corporate executives from a range of companies, members of the cabinet, and other senior administration officials to discuss the increasing trend of insourcing and ways to encourage companies across the country to insource American jobs to help rebuild the economy. Jensen is a professor at Georgetown University's McDonough School of Business and the author of the recently published book Global Trade in Services: Fear, Facts, and Offshoring.

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1990's

Brita (Muller) Boer ’90 has joined HRM Innovations, a Kalamazoo-based human resources management firm, as the director of people systems. Brita has 20 years of small business management experience in addition to her B.A. degree from K in English and psychology.
Marty Karamon ’92 and Karen Volk Saito '92 had the opportunity to get together in Ann Arbor, Michigan over the December 2012 holidays after making plans to see each other at their 20 year reunion in October 2012. Marty currently resides in Brooklyn, New York, and Karen lives in Ann Arbor.
Kyle Dell ’93 is an associate professor of political science at Guilford College (Greensboro, N.C.). He will spend the upcoming academic year at North Carolina State University as an American Council on Education Fellow. N.C. State Provost Warwick Arden will serve as Kyle's primary mentor; the university's president, William R. Woodson, will serve as a secondary mentor. The ACE Fellows Program, established in 1965, is designed to strengthen institutional capacity and build leadership in American higher education by identifying and preparing promising senior faculty and administrators for responsible positions in college and university administration. Fifty fellows, nominated by the presidents or chancellors of their institutions, were selected this year in a national competition. Nearly 2,000 higher education leaders have participated in the ACE Fellows Program since its inception, with more than 300 fellows having served as chief executive officers of colleges and universities and more than 1,300 having served as provosts, vice presidents, or deans.
Rob Passage ’93 has been promoted to assistant athletic director at Willamette University in Salem, Ore., where he had been serving as athletics facilities and operations manager. Rob will continue to manage Willamette's athletic facilities and operations under his new title. He was formerly head men's basketball coach and athletics facility coordinator at K.
Chris Kennelly ’97 is a local business owner in Northfield, Minn. In May he purchased the Northfield Construction Company, a full service general contracting firm that has performed residential and commercial contruction since 1972. Kennelly brings a solid background in real estate development and project management to the company. He worked in development as a vice president with Welsh Companies and The Excelsior Group in the twin cities before moving with his family to Northfield in 2012. He earned his B.A. from K in economics and business and his master's degree in business administration from the University of Colorado.

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2000's

Christian Grostic ’01 was counsel for petitioner in the Tennessee civil rights case Burnside v. Walters, No. 12-7892, which the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to hear this past May. The Supreme Court's decision to review the case spurred the lower court to overrule its 15-year-old precedent restricting equal access to the courts for indigent plaintiffs. Grostic works for the Cleveland (Ohio) law firm Kushner & Hamed.
Andrea (Bartuski) Dannenberg ’02 and her family recently relocated from Madison, Wisconsin, to Dubai, United Arab Emirates, after her husband, Dr. Luke Dannenberg, accepted a transfer to Roche Diagnostics Middle East. After a few months at home with their two children--Vince (3) and Edie (1)--Andrea rejoined the workforce as a proposal writer for Hart Security, a firm providing personal protection and guard services to the oil and gas industry and diplomatic facilities in Afghanistan and Iraq.
Carla Kupe-Arion ’02 has launched her own consulting agency: Global Outlook Consulting. GOC is a global market entry strategy provider for small to mid-sized United States companies seeking to enter markets abroad and for foreign companies poised to enter the U.S. market. GOC focuses on three particular phases of global expansion: market assessment, market entry, and marketing. It also offers culture education through its Global Insights seminars.
Stacey (Nastase) Lambert ’02 and her husband, Chad, welcomed their little girl to the world on June 19, 2013. Her name is Cameron Jenna--CJ for short. She joins big brother, Ty, who turned 2 years old in August.
Jody (Pung) Schafer ’02 owns her own business. She purchased Human Resource Management Services LLC in April, 2013. "What started out as a part-time consulting position in the field of Human Resources has blossomed into so much more!" she wrote. "I now have two consultants working with me to service our small to mid-sized clients all over the state of Michigan. We provide an outsourced HR solution for businesses that are not able to afford their own HR department. I am truly enjoying the work and the challenges that come along with being my own boss!"
Brett Hoy ’03 has been elected to the Indiana Chapter of The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS) Board of Directors. LLS board members are responsible for furthering LLS's mission to cure leukemia, lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease, and myeloma, and improve the quality of life of patients and their families. Brett is an attorney at the law firm Lewis Wagner, L.L.P. He specializes in general civil litigation and commercial transaction law.
Scott Petz ’03 was named by the Detroit Metropolitan Bar Association Barristers Section as the recipient of its 2013 "One to Watch" award. This annual award is presented to young attorneys based on their professional accomplishments that demonstrate not only their legal acumen and talent but also their potential for future professional growth and achievements. Petz received his award at this year's Outstanding Young Lawyers Awards ceremony in July. He is a litigation associate in the law firm Dickinson Wright's Detroit office. He focuses his practice in the areas of commercial & business litigation, class and collective actions, labor litigation, consumer protection, and condemnation and land use. He earned his J.D. from The John Marshall Law School.
Andrea (Braunz) Buchi ’04 married Steve Buchi on May 11, 2013 in Dearborn, Mich. Many of Andrea's classmates came out to celebrate! Pictured are (l-r): Lucia Brouwer, Nate Brouwer, Bree (Koehler) Brouwer, Paul Schramm, Steve and Andi, Erica (Zontek) Powell, Annika Rigole, and Emiko Oonk.
Holly Gillis ’09 traveled to England with her family to celebrate her graduation from medical school (Commonwealth Medical College, in Scranton, Penn.). And while in England,"the weirdest thing happened," Holly wrote. "On May 24, I was touring Westminster Abbey, and I was in the very back portion near where Queen Elizabeth I is interred over her half-sister Mary, and I turned to my right and thought I saw Emma and Rob Atwood. I thought I was wrong, but I got closer and it was them! What are the odds?! We caught up and completely violated proper Westminster code of conduct and snapped a picture with my iPhone. In a huge world, what is the likelihood that three Kalamazoo College alumni end up in the same Abbey in the same location at the same time?!" Emma (Perry) Atwood '08 is in a Ph.D. program (English Literature) at Boston University. Rob Atwood '07 recently completed a master's degree at Boston College in social work. He works for a hospice in Boston. Holly started her residency at the University of Minnesota Children's Hospital in June. Pictured in Westminster Abbey are (l-r): Holly, Emma, and Rob.

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2010's

David Greiner ’10 has joined Ann Arbor-based real estate broker Charles Reinhart Company. David previously worked as an independent real estate investor.
Alex Morgan ’11 completed his two-year Teach For America commitment in Milwaukee, but will stay another year to officially secure his teaching certificate and transfer it to other states. "I'll be staying at the same school in the same classroom," he wrote. "I'm happy that I've completed my graduate classes and will have more time to dedicate to my students this year!" Alex keeps an interesting blog titled "Michiganian in Milwaukee."
Mark Denenfeld ’12 is a volunteer assistant coach for the University of Michigan Women's Tennis team during the 2013-14 season. Mark spent the 2013 dual-match season as an assistant coach for the women's program at the University of Illinois, helping the Illini to a 14-11 overall record and a 6-5 mark in the Big Ten. While at K, Mark was a two-time All-MIAA Men's Tennis First Team honoree (2011, 2012) and earned second team honors as a sophomore (2010).
Megan Burns ’13 joins classmate Maya Smolcic '13 and fellow alum Torry Wenger '92 as recipients of Woodrow Wilson Teaching Fellowships. The W.K. Kellogg Foundation's Woodrow Wilson Teaching Fellowship attracts talented, committed individuals with backgrounds in the STEM fields--science, technology, engineering, and mathematics--into teaching in high-need Michigan secondary schools. The fellowship offers rigorous pedagogical preparation, extensive clinical immersion in secondary classrooms, and ongoing mentoring. Burns and Smolcic will attend Wayne State University. Wenger will attend Western Michigan University.

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In Memory

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1940's

Richard Howlett ’41 died on Sunday, August 4, 2013. He earned his bachelor's degree with a major in history. He was a veteran of World War II and served in the United States Army. Howlett began his teaching career in the Stockbridge (Mich.) Public Schools. He taught history and sociology, and he also coached football, basketball, and baseball. He later became principal of Stockbridge High School, retiring in 1980. His career in public education was a distinguished one, and the school district named two buildings in his honor: Stockbridge High School Richard C. Howlett Campus and Howlett Elementary School in Gregory (Mich.). Howlett also served as a village council member, and he was a member of Stockbridge United Methodist Church. In 1995, the Kalamazoo College Emeritus Club honored Howlett with its Citation of Merit Award. He enjoyed reading, golfing, and all sports.
Helene (Desich) Evans-Helling ’49 died May 26, 2013. She earned a Master of Library Sciences from Andrews University and worked for 27 years as a media specialist for the South Bend (Indiana) Community School Corporation. After retirement she read to children at Darden Elementary School and volunteered at St. Joseph Hospital in South Bend and at St. Pius Catholic Church.

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1950's

Donald Dayton ’55 died on June 29, 2013. He earned his B.A. at Kalamazoo College in English. He served in the U.S. Army in Germany between the Korean and Vietnam Wars. After returning home, he met and married Carol (Wall) Dayton. Together, they raised three sons. Don taught English in the Kalamazoo Public School System and subsequently served as the media specialist in the Gull Lake Public School System before retiring in 1990. He loved music, travel, classic movies, literature, history, and theater, participating in the Musical Messengers, Bach Festival Chorale, the Civic Players, the Kalamazoo Singers, the Kalamazoo Crusaders, the Second Reformed Church Choir, and the German-American Club of Kalamazoo.

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1960's

Walter Olmstead ’60 died on June 19, 2013. He attended Kalamazoo College as a member of the Class of 1960. On June 18, 1960, he married Gwen Osborne, and they celebrated 52 years together before Gwen preceded him in death on July 9, 2012. Walter worked as a foreman for Whirlpool Corp. and at Carl Heald Inc. for many years before relocating to Ludington, Mich., in 1989. He was an avid outdoorsman, enjoying hunting and fishing. He was a member of the Great Lakes Charter Boat Captains Association and the Berrien County Sportsman's Club. He also owned and operated Blue Water Sport Fishing Charters in St. Joseph.
Rebecca (Bahlman) Holmes ’63 died on June 24, 2013. She was an anthropologist, epidemiologist, and nature photographer. Holmes graduated from Kalamazoo College (B.A., biology) and The Venezuelan Institute for Scientific Research, in Caracas, Venezuela, where she spent most of her working life. Her career was largely devoted to organizing and managing medical outreach programs on behalf of Venezuela's indigenous and campesino populations. She also conducted scientific research and was published in professional journals. A Florida resident, she spent many summers with her husband, David Holmes, at their camp on the Greenbrier River near Cass. Her lifelong hobby was nature photography, and during a number of years her photos of Pocahontas County appeared in the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection's annual "Roadsides in Bloom" calendar.

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1970's

Rudolf Faller ’70 died September 3, 2012, in the Bavarian town of Ettal, where he had lived since 2004. He had battled cancer for almost a year. A native of Freiburg, Germany, Rudolf came to K as an exchange student from Bonn, Germany, in fall 1966. He bonded to K, making friends among students and faculty alike, and stayed in Kalamazoo to earn a master's degree in sociology from Western Michigan University. In the early 1970s Rudolf taught history and sociology on United States military bases in Germany, Italy, Spain, and Turkey through a program administered by the University of Maryland. In 1974 he moved to the Washington, D.C., area and completed his doctorate in sociology at the University of Maryland. He joined the Inter-American Development Bank's social evaluation department, eventually becoming the department's director. His work took him several times a year to Central and South America. Rudolf pursued a lifelong passion for the Catholic Church and, in particular, Pope Pius XII, creating an association to preserve the pope's memory and writing extensively about Pius and his works on Wikipedia. He also maintained close ties to Holy Cross Cistercian Monastery in Berryville, Va. He chose to retire to Ettal, a small monastery town in southern Bavaria, where he continued his charitable work as a member of the board of the monastery foundation. He is survived by a sister, niece, and nephew, all in Germany, and mourned by many friends on at least four continents.
Kenneth Silverman ’73 died on Monday June 17, 2013. He attended Kalamazoo College as a member of the Class of 1973 and transferred to the University of Rochester. He began his career in Ulster County, New York, working for Rotron and its parent company, EG&G. He was instrumental in establishing a Far East presence for the corporation, opening an office in Hong Kong and later in Taiwan where he met his wife, Candy. They settled in San Jose, California, where he was employed by Apple Inc. for the past 8 years. Silverman was a musical enthusiast throughout his life, serving as the lead guitarist in his high school rock band and cultivating an appreciation of all kinds of music, particularly jazz.
Mary Makowske ’78 died on March 20, 2013. She majored in chemistry at Kalamazoo College and studied abroad in Clermont-Ferrand, France. After obtaining a Ph.D. in biochemistry at the University of Michigan and a post-doctoral fellowship at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Institute in New York, Mary worked for more than 20 years as a research assistant professor at the State University of New York Downstate Medical Center (Brooklyn, New York). There she lectured medical and graduate students and studied the effects of protein kinase C isozymes in cell growth and differentiation. She was proudest of an award she received from her medical students for outstanding teaching. Mary enjoyed living in New York City, loved museums and the arts, traveled extensively, and is survived by her son, Ryan.
Margaret (Anderson) Noecker ’79 died on August 15, 2013. She is survived by her husband, William, and their children, Drew and Leah. Noecker earned her bachelor's degree in psychology (with honors) and studied abroad in Madrid, Spain. She and her husband, whom she married in 1981, together founded an aluminum fabricating company named Brasco International Inc., with locations in Madison Heights and Detroit. The most important thing in her life was her family. She also had a deep love of animals and rescued numerous dogs over the years. She exercised her mind by being smarter than the contestants on the game shows she watched on television. She had a secret ambition to compete on "Rock and Roll" Jeopardy.

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1980's

Michael Hoffhines ’80 died on May 5, 2013. He matriculated to Kalamazoo College from Forest Hills Northern High School (Grand Rapids, Mich.). He earned his B.A. in mathematics and studied abroad in Australia. He earned a master's degree in computer science from Michigan State University. He and his wife, Marilyn, moved to Hawaii. Hoffhines taught at the University of Hawaii. He enjoyed the ocean and was able to go on several government sponsored whale watches. After 10 years in Hawaii he moved to California to work for Apple Computer. He loved sports, particularly scuba diving. He often spent a couple of weeks each summer in the Sleeping Bear Dunes area of Northern Michigan.

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Friends

W. Haydn Ambrose died on September 6, 2014. Ambrose became vice president for development at Kalamazoo College in 1983, where he oversaw fundraising, alumni relations, public relations, publications and research, and launched a major capital campaign. He had served the College since 1967 in numerous roles, including assistant to the president for church relations, dean of admissions and financial aid, and associate director of development. He retired in 1988. Before joining Kalamazoo College, Ambrose was national director of campus ministry for the American Baptist Churches, based in Valley Forge, Pa. He had been the Baptist chaplain at the University of Illinois, and pastor of the First Baptist Church in Mankato, Minn. Ambrose was born in Ammanford, Wales in 1922 and moved to the U.S. with his family as a child. He received bachelor's degrees in history and theology from Eastern College and Eastern Baptist Seminary and was ordained to the ministry in 1945. He later studied at the Lancaster Seminary, the University of Illinois, and Western Michigan University, where he earned a master's degree in educational administration. In 1963, he received an honorary doctorate from the American Baptist Seminary of the West. In addition to numerous church curriculum texts, Ambrose was the author of The Church in the University, published in 1969. The work reflects Ambrose's lifelong commitment to the role of educational institutions in helping individuals and groups learn together in a context of freedom and creativity. He was an avid reader of history, theology, philosophy and science, and was very devoted to his Welsh heritage. He was very active in church and community groups, and met each week with other retired faculty and staff members of Kalamazoo College.
Harold Harris , Professor Emeritus of English, died on July 1, 2013. He was 89 years old. Harris was born December 15, 1924, in Patterson, N.J., the youngest of five sons, to Pauline and David Harris. He served in the Army during World War II, stationed in India and Ceylon (Sri Lanka), and then attended Rutgers University on the G.I. Bill. He met and married his wife of 64 years, Phyllis, in 1949. After Harris earned his Ph.D. from Ohio State University in 1954, he and Phyllis moved to Kalamazoo, where he joined the faculty of the English department of Kalamazoo College. He taught at K until his retirement in 1990. Harris had an enduring impact on the lives of many students and he remained in touch with quite a few of them. In addition to teaching, which he loved, Harris was a leader in the educational community. He created and directed Scholar's Day and the Great Lakes Colleges Award Competition for New Young Writers, both of which exist today. A distinguished scholar, Harris taught in France and Turkey and read critical articles at French, Swiss, German, and British institutions during the 1970s and 1980s. In 1979, he was awarded a National Endowment for the Humanities Grant to study Slavic literature in Seattle, Washington. He published much scholarly work, including studies of the writers James Joyce, George Orwell, and Fyodor Dostoyevsky. He co-founded the Michigan Association of Scholars, the mission of which was to maintain demanding academic standards in higher education; he served on its board for many years. Harris was active in the local community as well as the broader academic community. He served on the executive committee of the successful campaign to elect Paul Todd to Congress and, during the Vietnam War, chaired the Kalamazoo County Concerned Democrats. After he retired, Harris resumed writing plays. Over a period of several years, he wrote 10 plays, one of which was given a public reading locally.

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